Wisconsin

Republican Voter Fraud Found as Scott Walker Supporter Charged With 13 Felonies In Wisconsin

gop-voter-fraud

Hilarious…

PoliticusUSA

It turns out that voter fraud is real. A Republican Scott Walker supporter in Wisconsin has been charged with 13 felony counts related to voter fraud.

According to WisPolitics.com:

Robert Monroe, a 50-year-old Shorewood health insurance executive, was charged Friday with 13 felonies related to his voting a dozen times in five elections between 2011 and 2012 using his own name as well as that of his son and his girlfriend’s son.

According to those records, Monroe was considered by investigators to be the most prolific multiple voter in memory. He was a supporter of Gov. Scott Walker and state Sen. Alberta Darling, both Republicans, and allegedly cast five ballots in the June 2012 election in which Walker survived a recall challenge.

According to the John Doe records, Monroe claimed to have a form of temporary amnesia and did not recall the election day events when confronted by investigators.

Hallelujah!!!! Republicans have found their voter fraud. Unfortunately for them, they are the ones committing it. The Monroe case is even worse, because he voted multiple times in the April 2011 Wisconsin Supreme Court race that required a recount. This isn’t the first episode of Republican voter fraud in the state. In 2011, a Republican legislative aide was investigated for voting multiple times.

The greatest irony of all is that the Monroe case exposes why voter ID laws don’t do what Republicans claim they do. Since Republicans benefit most from absentee voting, they have refused to address the glaring potential for fraud by absentee ballot. The Republican in Wisconsin was able to commit multiple acts of state and federal voter fraud by using absentee ballots for state elections, and driving across state lines for federal elections.

Republican voter ID laws address none of these issues, and instead focus on suppressing the vote by requiring voters who are more likely to vote for Democrats to show identification. A person is least likely to have identification if they are living in the city, and don’t drive. Voter ID laws are being used to suppress the votes of women by making strict rules about acceptable names on the identification.

It turns out that voter fraud is real, and Republicans are guilty of doing it.

Maddow: Today was a bad day for governors who want to be president someday

govs

Governors Scott Walker of Wisconsin, former Montana Gov. Brian Schweitzer and Chris Christie of New Jersey

The Raw Story

Rachel Maddow crossed the aisle Thursday night, pointing out that today was not a very good day for three governors — two Republicans, one a Democrat — who have their eyes on the White House prize in the very near future.

Governors Scott Walker of Wisconsin, Chris Christie of New Jersey, and former Montana Gov. Brian Schweitzer all began the day with bad news and, as Maddow explained, “They kind of made the bad news themselves.”

Starting with Gov. Walker, who must first get re-elected in his state before making a run for the presidency, Maddow pointed ou that his day started off poorly when newly released data showed the state of Wisconsin 37th in job creation.

“Scott Walker, of course, ran as the guy who was going to create jobs in Wisconsin,” she explained. “When you make something the central point of why you’re running for office, being bad at that specific thing ends up being a really big political liability.”

Walker’s day grew worse when previously sealed documents revealed he is at the center of what prosecutors are calling a “sweeping criminal scheme.”

Maddow added that this is part of an investigation into political shenanigans that has been going on for sometime, but now the public knows about it.

“There it is all over the news today, all over Wisconsin, all over the country, in black and white: ‘Prosecutors say Gov. Scott Walker part of criminal scheme.’”

Maddow then moved onto New Jersey Gov Chris Christie, referring to a report in the Wall Street Journal last week stating that federal prosecutors had impaneled a new  special grand jury just to handle Christie corruption cases.

Today Esquire revealed that sources say four staffers and appointees of Christie are likely looking at indictments being handed down.

“After what the Wall Street Journal said last week, and what Esquire magazine said today,” Maddow said. “Well, that made for bad day in the news for governor  who wants to be president number two.”

Maddow then turned to Schweitzer who did the damage to himself in an interview with the National Journal titled, ‘The Gonzo Option.’

“The article was just posted  today, Brian Schweitzer has already apologized for the things he said to the the reporter in this article,” Maddow explained. “But what he said to the reporter in this article is not the thing that an apology usually makes go away.”

Maddow pointed out that Schweitzer compared Sen. Dianne Feinstein to a streetwalker,  said his ‘gaydar’ told him Coingressman Eric Cantor was gay, and added that southern men sound ‘effeminate.’

“Governor Brian Schweitzer, again, has apologized for these remarks. He called them ‘stupid and insensitive.’ He said he is deeply sorry he said these these things, but you know, even just the Dianne Feinstein  comments alone,… is there really a deeply sorry, deep enough?”

Watch the video on The Rachel Maddow Show

Breaking News! Prosecutors: Scott Walker at the Center of a “Criminal Scheme” (Update)

Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker | Spencer Platt – Getty Images

Anyone surprised at this outcome?  I’m not…

Daily Kos

OMG!
200 pages of documents have been unsealed by a Federal Judge in one of the 4 legal efforts to shut down John Doe II – a secret investigation looking at whether or not there was illegal coordination between RW dark money groups and recall campaigns in Wisconsin.  They say Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker (R-YourOnYourOwniStan) was at the center of it.

In the documents, prosecutors lay out what they call a “criminal scheme” to bypass state election laws by Walker, his campaign and two top deputies — R.J. Johnson (an advisor to both Walkers Campaign and Wisconsin Club for Growth) and Deborah Jordahl.

(information bolded is mine and information in italics is my addition)The documents allege that Walker and his associates raised money and controlled spending by conservative groups during the 2012 recall elections.  In Wisconsin, there can’t be coordination between campaigns and outside spending groups.

In an email to Karl Rove, Scott Walker said:

“Bottom-line: R.J. helps keep in place a team that is wildly successful in Wisconsin. We are running 9 recall elections and it will be like 9 congressional markets in every market in the state (and Twin Cities),” Walker wrote to Rove on May 4, 2011.

OMG! Side order of Karl Rove to go along with this, too.  Pinch me, I might be dreaming.

This case is currently being reviewed by the 7th Circuit Court after Federal Judge Rudolf Randa (a member of the Federalist Society whose wife donated often to Walkers campaign and whose Judicial Assistant is the wife of Scott Walkers lawyer) ordered the investigation shut down and evidence collected by the investigators destroyed (the 7th Circuit immediately intervened to prevent the destruction).

It is a judge reviewing the case that unsealed the documents today.

Seeing this, it’s small wonder they’ve been running to every court imaginable and writing editorials for RW newspapers to get this thing shut down.

This story is just breaking so stay tuned for further developments.

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Here’s a link to the raw documents.  (Warning:  large pdf file)

So far, nobody is commenting on this, but I’ll bet Walkers hair is on fire trying to think of something to say.

UPDATE:  Link to the John Doe II prosecutors appeal of the case.  (Warning:  pdf file)

They delineate the coordination and conference calls.

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For those interested in how Walker gets to pull the wool over the eyes of so many voters in Wisconsin, The New Republic has an excellent article.  I can’t recommend it more highly.

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Politico has an article up.  This is becoming national news.

And MSNBC posted an article as well.

Wisconsin Attorney General Threatens Clerks Who Approve Gay Marriage

Photo: No attribution

Liberaland

Wisconsin Attorney General J. B. Van Hollen is warning clerks that they can be prosecuted for issuing marriage licenses to gay couples, even though a federal judge has declared the state’s ban on gay marriage unconstitutional.

Van Hollen, a Republican, told the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel newspaper that gay couples who have married since U.S. District Judge Barbara Crabb issued her ruling last week aren’t legally married and district attorneys could opt to charge county clerks who issued them licenses with a crime.

“That’s going to be up to district attorneys, not me,” Van Hollen said. “There are penalties within our marriage code, within our statues, and hopefully they’re acting with full awareness of what’s contained therein. … You do have many people in Wisconsin basically taking the law into their own hands, and there can be legal repercussions for that.”

Clerks began issuing licenses June 6, hours after Crabb’s ruling came out. As of Thursday, 60 of the state’s 72 counties were issuing licenses.

But confusion has swirled about what clerks can legally do. Crabb declared the ban unconstitutional but did not issue any orders telling clerks to issue licenses. Van Hollen maintains that without such an order the ban remains in place.

 

More from Liberaland

10 things you need to know today: April 30, 2014

Banned!

Banned! (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

The Week

The NBA bans Clippers owner Donald Sterling for life, Oklahoma inmate dies in botched execution, and more

1. NBA bans Sterling over racist comments
The National Basketball Association on Tuesday banned Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling for life and fined him $2.5 million in a dramatic reaction to racist comments he allegedly made in a secretly recorded conversation. Commissioner Adam Silver said he would try to force Sterling to sell his team, a strong-arm move requiring the approval of three-quarters of team owners. Sterling’s views, Silver said, “simply have no place in the NBA.” [The New York Times]

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2. Oklahoma murderer dies after his botched execution is halted
An Oklahoma death row inmate, Clayton Lockett, died of a heart attack Tuesday night after hislethal injection was botched. Prison officials had called a halt to the execution after Lockett’s vein burst when the first of three drugs was administered, preventing the lethal ones from entering his system. Gov. Mary Fallin (R) issued a 14-day stay for the second inmate who was scheduled to die in the state’s first double execution since 1937. [USA Today]

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3. Judge throws out Wisconsin’s new Voter ID law
A federal judge in Wisconsin has struck down the state’s Voter ID law, saying the state failed to demonstrate that voter fraud exists and that the state can take steps to stop it. “The evidence at trial established that virtually no voter impersonation occurs in Wisconsin,” District Judge Lynn Adelman said. Another judge threw out a similar law in Arkansas last week. [The Washington Post]

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4. Watchdog looks into allegations of Syria gas attacks
The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons announced Tuesday that it was sending investigators to Syria to look into allegations that government forces had launched three chlorine gas attacks against rebels in the last month. The watchdog has overseen the destruction or export of 92 percent of the chemical arms Syria has promised to surrender. Chlorine, which has many industrial uses, is not one of the substances on the list. [Reuters]

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5. Gunman wounds six at FedEx sorting warehouse
Witnesses said a FedEx employee who was armed “like Rambo” shot six people at one of the delivery company’s sorting facilities, in Atlanta, before shooting himself to death on Tuesday. Two of the victims were hospitalized with life-threatening, close-range shotgun wounds. A FedEx worker said the shooter was wearing black and camouflage. “As soon as I saw guns strapped to his chest and everything,” she said, “I knew something was wrong.” [Los Angeles Times]

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6. Court explains why it found Amanda Knox guilty
An Italian court that convicted Amanda Knox in January for the 2007 murder of her British roommate, Meredith Kercher, released its reasoning on Tuesday, saying that Kercher’s wounds indicated that the man already convicted in the killing, Rudy Guede, did not act alone. The court said it had concluded that Knox, who returned to the U.S. after an earlier conviction was reversed, slit Kercher’s throat in rage after the two argued about money. The next step is likely another appeal. [New York Daily News]

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7. Australian firm says missing jet might have crashed near Bangladesh
An Australian geological survey company says its radiation scanning technology found evidence suggesting the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 might have crashed in the Bay of Bengal off Bangladesh, thousands of kilometers from the current search area off Australia. The company, GeoResonance, said it detected a sudden deposit of aluminum — the plane’s chief component — on the sea floor after the plane vanished on March 8. [TIME]

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8. Hawaii legislature approves $10.10 minimum wage
Lawmakers in Hawaii made their state the latest to raise its minimum wage, voting late Tuesday to hike the rate to $10.10 an hour from the federal minimum of $7.25 by January 2018. That would bring Hawaii in line with a target wage set by President Obama, whose push for a higher federal minimum wage has stalled in Congress. California, Maryland, Connecticut, and Washington, D.C., have already approved hikes to $10 or more an hour. [Reuters]

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9. Olympic officials express doubts over Rio’s preparations for 2016
The International Olympic Committee is getting worried about Rio de Janeiro’s readiness for the 2016 Summer Olympics, committee vice president John Coates said Tuesday. He called preparations in the Brazilian city — the first in South America to host the games — “the worst I have experienced.” Construction has just begun on a sports complex that will house 11 events. Still, Coates said, “There can be no Plan B; we are going to Rio.” [The New York Times]

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10. Next Star Wars movie brings back original cast
Disney has revealed that the cast of the next Star Wars film will include original stars Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford, and Carrie Fisher returning to their original 1977 roles as Luke Skywalker, Han Solo, and Princess Leia. The plot picks up three decades after the story in Return of the Jedi. The movie, which also stars a new crop of actors, is scheduled for world release in December 2015. [CNN]

 

Wisconsin Voter ID Law Rejected By Federal Judge

WISCONSIN STATE CAPITOL| Visions of America/Joe Sohm via Getty Images

Undoubtedly the State of Wisconsin will take this all the way to the Supreme Court of the United States where the majority of Justices are more amenable to knocking down civil rights gains of the past…

The Huffington Post

A  federal judge in Milwaukee struck down Wisconsin’s voter identification law Tuesday, declaring that a requirement that voters show a state-issued photo ID at the polls imposes an unfair burden on poor and minority voters.

U.S. District Judge Lynn Adelman sided with opponents of the law, who argued that low-income and minority voters aren’t as likely to have photo IDs or the documents needed to get them. Adelman said the law violated the U.S. Constitution’s guarantee of equal protection. He also said the law appeared too flawed to be fixed by legislative amendments.

Adelman’s decision invalidates Wisconsin’s law and means voter ID likely won’t be in place for the fall elections, when Republican Gov. Scott Walker faces re-election. While Walker last month committed to calling a special legislative session if the law were struck down in court, his spokeswoman wouldn’t commit to that Tuesday.

“We believe the voter ID law is constitutional and will ultimately be upheld,” Walker spokeswoman Laurel Patrick said in an email. “We’re reviewing the decision for any potential action.”

The ruling could set a precedent for similar legal challenges in Texas, North Carolina and elsewhere. There are 31 states with laws in effect requiring voters to show some form of identification, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. Seven states have strict photo ID requirements similar to the one a state judge struck down in Arkansas last week; that decision has been appealed to the Arkansas Supreme Court. Pennsylvania’s voter ID law has been put on hold because of court challenges.

Earlier this month, President Barack Obama waded into the voter ID debate, accusing Republicans of using restrictions to keep voters from the polls and jeopardizing 50 years of expanded voting access for millions of black Americans and other minorities.

A Dane County judge had already blocked Wisconsin’s law in state court. The state Supreme Court heard arguments in two separate lawsuits in February, although it’s not clear when the justices will issue a ruling. For voter ID to be reinstated, the state’s high court would have to rule that it doesn’t violate the state constitution, and Adelman’s decision would have to be overturned on appeal.

Wisconsin’s Department of Justice, which defended the state law in court, pledged to continue the fight.

“I am disappointed with the order and continue to believe Wisconsin’s law is constitutional,” Attorney General J.B. Van Hollen said in a statement. “We will appeal.”

Republican backers had argued that requiring voters to show ID would cut down on voter fraud and boost public confidence in the integrity of the election process. But Adelman said the state failed to prove that voter fraud is a legitimate problem.

“(V)irtually no voter impersonation occurs in Wisconsin and it is exceedingly unlikely that voter impersonation will become a problem in Wisconsin in the foreseeable future,” he wrote in a 90-page opinion.

Wisconsin’s Republican-led Legislature passed the photo ID requirement in 2011, scoring a long-sought GOP priority. Former Gov. Jim Doyle, a Democrat, had vetoed a similar requirement three times between 2002 and 2005.

Wisconsin’s law was only in effect for a 2012 primary before a Dane County judge declared it unconstitutional.

Adelman pledged to expedite any proceedings should Wisconsin’s Legislature attempt to amend the law, but he also had strong cautionary words for lawmakers.

“Given the evidence presented at trial showing that Blacks and Latinos are more likely than whites to lack an ID, it is difficult to see how an amendment to the photo ID requirement could remove its disproportionate racial impact and discriminatory result,” Adelman wrote.

Wisconsin residents can get a free state ID from a Department of Motor Vehicles by presenting documents such as a certified birth certificate, passport or Social Security card. Each document must be unexpired, and the person’s name must be spelled identically on each document.

A number of witnesses testified the regulation was a problem, either because their names were misspelled on a key document or because they were born in rural areas during an era when birth certificates weren’t always issued.

Adelman cited their testimony in his ruling, noting that they faced challenges that could deter them from voting.

“Although not every voter will face all of these obstacles, many voters will face some of them, particularly those who are low-income,” the judge wrote.

The federal challenge combined two separate cases. One was brought by minority-rights groups, including the Wisconsin chapter of the League of United Latin American Citizens, and the other involved the American Civil Liberties Union and the Washington, D.C.-based Advancement Project.

ACLU spokesman Dale Ho said his group was “ecstatic” over the victory, and felt Adelman rendered a fair assessment of the evidence.

“We’re pleased. We feel vindicated by the judge’s decision,” he said.

Homeless Couple Gets A Home On Christmas Eve, Thanks To Innovative ‘Occupy’ Group

Tiny house – CREDIT: NBC 15 WMTV

For one homeless couple the Occupy Madison (Wisconsin) group performed a small but awesome miracle…

Think Progress

For many couples, the thought of living together in a 96-square-foot house sounds awful. But for Chris Derrick and Betty Ybarra, it’s a Christmas miracle.

That’s because Derrick and Ybarra  have spent the better part of a year braving Madison, Wisconsin’s often-harsh climate without a roof over their head.

They’ll spend this Christmas in their own home, thanks to more than 50 volunteers with Occupy Madison, a local Wisconsin version of the original Occupy Wall Street group in New York. The group, including Derrick and Ybarra, spent the past year on an innovative and audacious plan to fight inequality in the state’s capital: build tiny homes for the homeless.

In a city where an average home for sale costs nearly $300,000, many low-income individuals simply can’t afford somewhere to live.

Indeed, in January of this year, a citywide count found 831 homeless people living in Madison, a 47 percent increase in the past 3 years. And it’s not just adults; 110 families with children were identified as well.

The “Tiny House Project” began the same month. The plan was for volunteers to build micro-homes that still include living necessities like a bed, insulation, and a toilet. The homes are heated via propane and include a pole-mounted solar panel to power the house’s light. The total cost: $3,000, paid for by private donations.

Rather than building the homes on a particular lot of land — and thus adding another expense — the houses are mounted on trailers which can be legally parked on the street, as long as they’re moved every 48 hours. Parking on the street may not even be necessary after Occupy organizers successfully convinced the Madison Common Council recently to change the city’s zoning laws so the homes could be parked on private property with permission.

As Occupy Madison continues to build more tiny houses, it hopes to eventually buy a plot of land and create a tiny village with as many as 30 homes.

“It’s not just a shelter, it’s a commitment to a lifestyle,” Brenda Konkel, who heads a tenants’ rights non-profit in Madison, said during the zoning meeting, according to The Capital Times. “It’s a co-op mixed with Habitat for Humanity mixed with eco-village as the long-term goal.”

On Tuesday, Christmas Eve, Ybarra and Derrick moved into their new home. Ybarra said the moment was “exciting,” telling NBC 15 that she’d never owned her own home before, much less one she helped build. Occupy Madison posted this video to mark the occasion.

Though a common critique of the Occupy movement was that its goals were nebulous and unspecific, it has effected a significant amount of change on a local level. This includes savingmany people’s homes from foreclosure and buying up (and then forgiving) $15 million of consumer debt for pennies on the dollar.

 

Watch: Wisconsin Capitol police tackle man for photographing progressive protest

Damon Terrell arrest (Screenshot)

Police have been behaving aggressively toward citizen activism all around the country for a few years now.  What’s behind these excessive police tactics?

The protests are peaceful, yet in Wisconsin and North Carolina dozens are arrested weekly.

The videos below, in my opinion, show blatant infringement on citizens’ civil liberties as guaranteed by The United States Constitution.

Raw Story

A photographer and activist was aggressively arrested at the Wisconsin Capitol on Monday during a daily sing along protest.

Video of the incident uploaded to YouTube showed two police officers approaching Damon Terrell, who can be heard saying, “This is not illegal.” As Terrell backed away, one of the officers grabbed him. Terrell ended up on the ground with three officers on top of him.

Another video uploaded to YouTube showed four officers carrying Terrell out of the rotunda by his arms and legs.

Christopher J. Terrell, Damon’s brother, was also arrested for participating in the “Solidarity Sing Along” demonstration in the Capitol.

“The brothers have had a history of demonstrating and arrests by the capitol police, at times that has involved the brothers shouting at officers,” said Michael Phillis of the Wisconsin-Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

The daily demonstrations began during the 2011 budget protests. A judge ruled in July that groups of more than 20 people could not gather in the Wisconsin Capitol without a permit, igniting a wave of arrests and citations.

Earlier this month, a Wisconsin lawmaker and a state official were both threatened with arrest for merely observing the demonstration.

Watch the videos, uploaded to YouTube, below:

 

 

 

CRAZY TALK: DESPITE DENIALS, SOME ALREADY MAKING 2016 MOVES

Ready for 2016…

The Huffington Post

Chris Christie, Bobby Jindal Among Those Making Moves Toward 2016 Campaigns

Get your face on TV and write a book: Check. Start meeting the big money people: Check. Visit Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina – Israel, too: Check.

Deny any of this has to do with running for president: Check.

For politicians planning or tempted to run for the presidency in 2016, the to-do list is formidable. What’s striking is how methodically most of them are plowing through it while they pretend nothing of the sort is going on.

Somehow, it has been decreed that politicians who fancy themselves presidential timber must wear a veil concealing the nakedness of their ambition. They must let the contours show through, however – more and more over time – while hoping everyone doesn’t tire of the tease.

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul, Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan, Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley and Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, among others, are hewing closely to the scripted chores of soon-to-runs. Hillary Rodham Clinton and New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo are among those coming out with a book, almost a perquisite these days, while otherwise diverting from the usual path of preparation, for reasons that make strategic sense for them (and, you never know, could merely reflect indecision).

There is so much to do: Polish a record, for those in office; network with central constituencies of the party; take a serious stab at social media; start dealing with pesky baggage; and get going with a shadow campaign, which can mean bringing on national advisers, powering up a political action committee, or both. The little-knowns must get better known. The well-knowns must shape how people know them.

Governors Chris Christie of New Jersey and Bobby Jindal of Louisiana say it’s crazy to be preparing for a campaign this soon.

If so, then Christie, Jindal and the whole lot of them are crazy.

Paul is going full steam on prep, making all the necessary moves (visits to New Hampshire, Iowa and South Carolina among them), while stating his only motive is to help the Republican Party grow. This, despite hard-line tactics in the Senate that do not resemble outreach to GOP factions other than his own.

Still, he’s been more upfront than most in acknowledging the possibility of a presidential campaign. Rubio, for one, claims such a campaign hasn’t crossed his mind even as he’s been running one, in all but name, at least since he darted into Iowa mere days after the 2012 election. Among Democrats, O’Malley now is openly talking about a 2016 race.

Everything Clinton does, short of brushing her teeth, is parsed for presidential campaign meaning. If her brand of toothpaste were known, that would be factored in the punditry, too. “I have absolutely no plans to run,” she says, turning to the most time-worn dodge, which persuades no one, including the supporters and donors who raised more than $1 million in June alone without any discouragement from her.

Happily for hopefuls, much of what they do as public officials is multipurpose, giving them a veneer of deniability even if no one believes it.

Vice President Joe Biden chats up people from key primary states and Democratic interest groups, but, hey, that’s just Joe the king of schmooze, right?

Christie staged a national fundraising tour this summer, swelling coffers for what’s expected to be a cakewalk to a second term as governor but, more important, making the coast-to-coast money connections he’d need for a Republican presidential race. Many could-be candidates travel to raise money for others, similarly introducing themselves to donors for their own potential benefit down the road.

Rare is the presidential prospect who hasn’t been to Israel, the New Hampshire of the Middle East, small in size but big as a touchstone of U.S politics, and it’s easy for a senator to find reasons to go. Paul and Rubio did early this year. Governors pad thin foreign policy resumes with trade missions or other events abroad, as Wisconsin’s Scott Walker did with a summer visit to China. Christie made Israel his first overseas trip as governor last year. O’Malley made a return visit in April.

Many of these people have positions in party organizations or governors associations that make a trip to New Hampshire or a splashy speech in California look like something other than an effort to grease their own wheels for 2016. That’s especially handy for governors, who risk flak at home if seen preening for a national audience. That hasn’t stopped Christie, though, from going for laughs on late-night talk shows or agreeing to a sitcom stint this fall on Michael J. Fox’s new show.

Walker got to preen at home this summer, hosting the National Governors Association annual meeting in Milwaukee. He says he won’t think about running for president until the 2014 governor’s election is over. No one believes him. Notably, he won’t commit to serving all four years if he wins another term.

Both Walker and Jindal are introducing themselves to South Carolina conservatives in a fundraising visit for Gov. Nikki Haley in late August.

Continue reading here…

 

Ouch! Sarah Silverman’s Tweet For WI Governor Scott Walker

Liberals Unite

The infamous Scott Walker recently signed a mandatory bill to force any woman wanting to get an abortion in Wisconsin to undergo a medically unnecessary and invasive vaginal ultrasound so she can have an “informed decision.” Here’s comedian and actor Sarah Silverman’s response, which was retweeted by some Democratic state politicians, causing the Republicans to cry, “rape threat to Scott Walker!” Oh, the delicious irony.

So tell us in the comments — was this over the top?

 

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