Tag Archives: separation of church and state

Louie Gohmert: ‘Separation of church and state’ means ‘church plays a role in the state’

Louie Gohmert speaks to WND

 

We all know Rep. Louie Gohmert is far from the “sharpest tool in the shed” but this is more outrageous than many of his other rants…

The Raw Story

Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-TX) said this week that the constitutional separation between church and state was meant to be a “one-way wall” where the “church plays a role in the state.”

In a World Net Daily-sponsored promotion for an upcoming Christian TV event called “Washington – A Man of Prayer,” Gohmert recalled that the U.S. House of Representatives once met in what is now known as National Statuary Hall.

“On Sundays this became the largest non-denominational Christian church in the Washington, D.C. area,” he explained. “People came in here and prayed, they sang hymns, they worshipped God. It was part of our history.”

Gohmert pointed out that a Congressional Research Service report revealed that President Thomas Jefferson, who coined the phrase “separation of church and state,” had also attended church services at Statuary Hall.

“But it was to be a one-way wall, where the state would not dictate to the church,” the Texas Republican insisted. “But the church would certainly play a role in the state.”

“So, that’s a little different idea than a lot of people have about separation of church and state now,” he added. “Including some of our esteemed Supreme Court, who are not quite as familiar with our history as they probably should be.”

Watch the video from World Net Daily, broadcast March 31, 2014, HERE

 

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Filed under First Amendment, Separation of Church and State

Quaint Texas Church Tells People to Vote for the ‘Mormon, Not the Muslim’

Unbelievable.  I’m beginning to think that utterly ridiculous movie from a few years ago, Idiocracy, is starting to take hold in our country…

Gawker

You really have to visit the lovely town of Leakey, Texas, home to The Church in the Valley, a hidden little Southwestern sanctuary just 90 miles northwest of San Antonio. It has the most adorable signage! Take, for instance, the one that points to the road and says, ahem:

“VOTE FOR THE MORMON, NOT THE MUSLIM! FOR THE CAPITALIST, NOT THE COMMUNIST!”

Now isn’t that cute? Apparently the church’s pastor, Ray Miller, thought up the idea for the sign all by his little old self. I mean, certain clueless tourists have pointed out that this may conflict with the separation of church and state, but they obviously don’t know how to embrace their cultural surroundings.

Other lovely decorations on the grounds include the sign below, which is less clever, but still profound!

Quaint Texas Church Tells People to Vote for the 'Mormon, Not the Muslim'—You Should Stop By and Pray Sometime!

If you’re interested in paying your own visit to Leakey, and all the welcoming establishments it has to offer, just follow this map, included in this post for you convenience, into the bum-fuck middle-of-nowhere Texas. But don’t go if you’re Muslim!

Quaint Texas Church Tells People to Vote for the 'Mormon, Not the Muslim'—You Should Stop By and Pray Sometime!

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Filed under Idiocracy, Ignorance

“About.com”: Nutty Right-Wing Quotes

Which are your favorites?

About.com

  • Ann Coulter: ”You will find liberals always rooting for savages against civilization.”
  • Bill O’Reilly: ”They didn’t root for the Nazis against civilization.”
  • Coulter: ”Oh yes they did. … It was only when Hitler invaded their precious Soviet Union that at the last minute they came in and suddenly started saying, ‘Oh no, now you have to fight Hitler.”’

—’The O’Reilly Factor,’ May 7, 2010

  • ”African-American is a bogus, PC, made-up term. I mean, that’s not a race. Your ancestry is from Africa and now you live in America.”

—Glenn Beck, on his radio show, Jan. 7, 2010

  • ”The greatest threat to America is not necessarily a recession or even another terrorist attack. The greatest threat to America is a liberal media bias.”

—Rep. Lamar Smith (R-TX), June 4, 2009

  • ”I even accept for the sake of argument that sexual orgies eliminate social tensions and ought to be encouraged.”

—Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia

  • ”I’ve always been fascinated by the fact that here was a relatively small country that from a strictly military point of view accomplished incredible things.”

—Ohio GOP House candidate and Tea Party favorite Rich Iott, explaining why for years he donned a German Waffen SS uniform and participated in Nazi re-enactments as part of a group that calls itself Wiking (Atlantic interview, Oct. 2010)

  • ”The only way to reduce the number of nuclear weapons is to use them.”

—Rush Limbaugh

  •  ”As Putin rears his head and comes into the air space of the United States of America, where— where do they go? It’s Alaska. It’s just right over the border.”

—Sarah Palin, explaining why Alaska’s proximity to Russia gives her foreign policy experience, interview with CBS’s Katie Couric, Sept. 24, 2008

”Do you know, where does this phrase ‘separation of church and state’ come from? It was not in Jefferson’s letter to the Danbury Baptists. … The exact phrase ‘separation of Church and State’ came out of Adolph Hitler’s mouth, that’s where it comes from. So the next time your liberal friends talk about the separation of Church and State, ask them why they’re Nazis.”

—Glen Urquhart, the Tea Party-backed Republican nominee for the Delaware House seat held by Rep. Mike Castle, April 2010

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Filed under GOP Folly, GOP Political Attacks, Humor, Partisan Politics, Political Humor

The Top 10 Craziest Quotes by Tea Party Candidates

Huffington Post

Regardless of the outcome of the 2010 elections, the Tea Party has already made history by spawning the craziest crop of political candidates America has ever seen. Judge for yourself by reading this assemblage of Tea Party wisdom on everything from Nazi reenactments and violent revolutions to masturbation, witchcraft, and mice with human brains. Help pick the nuttiest Tea Party candidate by rating their most ridiculous quotes so far.

Sharron Angle

“I hope that’s not where we’re going, but you know if this Congress keeps going the way it is, people are really looking toward those Second Amendment remedies and saying my goodness what can we do to turn this country around? I’ll tell you the first thing we need to do is take Harry Reid out.” —Nevada GOP Senate candidate Sharron Angle, floating the possibility of armed insurrection by conservatives, interview with right-wing radio host Lars Larson, Jan. 14, 2010 (Source)

Christine O’Donnell 

“American scientific companies are cross-breeding humans and animals and coming up with mice with fully functioning human brains.” —Delaware GOP Senate candidate Christine O’Donnell, discussing cloning with Fox News Channel’s Bill O’Reilly, 2007 (Source)

Rich Iott 

“I’ve always been fascinated by the fact that here was a relatively small country (Nazi Germany) that from a strictly military point of view accomplished incredible things.” —Ohio GOP House candidate and Tea Party favorite Rich Iott, explaining why for years he donned a German Waffen SS uniform and participated in Nazi re-enactments as part of a group that calls itself Wiking, Oct. 2010 (Source) Iott later said the Nazi soldiers “were doing what they thought was right for their country.” (Source)

Sharron Angle

“People ask me, ‘What are you going to do to develop jobs in your state?’ Well, that’s not my job as a U.S. senator.” —Sharron Angle, May 14, 2010 ( Source)

Christine O’Donnell

“It is not enough to be abstinent with other people, you also have to be abstinent alone. The Bible says that lust in your heart is committing adultery. You can’t masturbate without lust! … You’re going to be pleasing each other. And if he already knows what pleases him and he can please himself, then why am I in the picture?” —Christine O’Donnell, advocating against masturbation in a 1996 MTV interview (Source)

Joe Miller

“The first thing that has to be done is secure the border … East Germany was very, very able to reduce the flow. Now, obviously, other things were involved. We have the capacity to, as a great nation, secure the border. If East Germany could, we could.” —Alaska GOP Senate candidate Joe Miller, on how to deal with illegal immigration, Oct. 17, 2010 (Source)

 Glen Urquhart

“Do you know, where does this phrase ‘separation of church and state’ come from? It was not in Jefferson’s letter to the Danbury Baptists. … The exact phrase ‘separation of Church and State’ came out of Adolph Hitler’s mouth, that’s where it comes from. So the next time your liberal friends talk about the separation of Church and State, ask them why they’re Nazis.” —Glen Urquhart, the Tea Party-backed Republican nominee for the Delaware House seat held by Rep. Mike Castle, April 2010 (Source)

Christine O’Donnell

“I’m not a witch…I’m you.” —Christine O’Donnell, in a 30-second ad responding to a video clip from a 1999 appearance on Bill Maher’s “Politically Incorrect,” in which she said, “I dabbled into witchcraft — I never joined a coven. But I did, I did… I dabbled into witchcraft. I hung around people who were doing these things. I’m not making this stuff up. I know what they told me they do… One of my first dates with a witch was on a satanic altar, and I didn’t know it. I mean, there’s little blood there and stuff like that. We went to a movie and then had a midnight picnic on a satanic altar.” (Source)

Stephen Broden

“Our nation was founded on violence. The option is on the table. I don’t think that we should ever remove anything from the table as it relates to our liberties and our freedoms.” —Tea Party-backed Texas GOP congressional candidate Stephen Broden, suggesting the violent overthrow of the U.S. government if Republicans don’t win at the ballot box, interview with Dallas’s WFAA-TV, Oct. 21, 2010 (Source)

Sharron Angle

“So that’s what we want is a secure and sovereign nation and, you know, I don’t know that all of you are Latino. Some of you look a little more Asian to me. I don’t know that. What we know, what we know about ourselves is that we are a melting pot in this country. My grandchildren are evidence of that. I’m evidence of that. I’ve been called the first Asian legislator in our Nevada State Assembly.” —Sharron Angle, speaking to a group of Hispanic high school students, Oct. 15, 2010 (Source)

See all 20 quotes and slideshow here…

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Filed under Tea Partiers, Tea Party, Tea Party Hypocrisy, Tea Party Ignorance

Ken Buck Can’t Explain How Government ‘Goes Too Far’ In Separating Church And State

This is the reason most Tea Party candidates like Sharron Angle, Christine O’Donnell, Rand Paul and others refuse to talk to the media.  They know that because they are not “polished politicians”, they’re  prone to make mahy gaffes that will most certainly be headlines the following day as well as “breaking news” on televison and cable networks.

The fact is, these people are NOT the sharpest tools in the shed.  Ken Buck is indeed one of the duller tools.  (I hope Michele Bachmann’s constitution classes for the freshman teabagger representatives and senators teaches them something.)

Think Progress

Yesterday, ThinkProgress noted the anti-Constitution stance taken by the Republican Senate candidate in Colorado Ken Buck, who said that “I disagree strongly with the concept of separation of church and state.” The story quickly gained mainstream media attention.

Spokespeople for the Buck campaign insist that the comments were “taken out of context,” and Buck gave an interview to CNN yesterday to defend his comments:

BUCK: My problem isn’t with separation of church and state. It is with how far we have gone in that area. I think when you have a soup kitchen for example that is run by the Salvation Army which has religious ties in town and you have another soup kitchen in town which is purely secular. For the federal government to give one organization money but not the other because one has ties with a religious group is wrong. The idea is that we need to have compassionate programs for people. And if religious organizations are performing some of those functions without proselytizing then I think the federal government should include both.

Buck’s comments were not taken out of context. The original post included the entirety of his comments on the separation of church and state. A video of his entire answer — which was not about the First Amendment, but rather the government’s role in preserving culture — can be found here. As Denver Post columnist Mike Littwin observed, noting Buck’s recent attempt to take back comments he made about global warming, the campaign’s “default position” is “that whenever Buck is quoted as saying something he wished he hadn’t said, he must not have actually meant it.” (As the Wonk Room noted, Buck also said he wanted to privatize Social Security, then insisted that he didn’t.)

Moreover, much like the deceit in his original comments, which falsely suggested that Obama renamed the White House Christmas tree, Buck is completely wrong with his Salvation Army example. According to their 2010 Annual Report, the Salvation Army received over $392 million in government funds last year. They are simply not allowed to use that money to proselytize, exactly as Buck recommends should be done, but certainly can use it to provide “compassionate programs” for people.

Buck has consistently said that the government has “gone too far” with the separation between church and state, yet he’s been unable to give a valid example. Perhaps he’s misinformed about current federal policy and would find it satisfactory. Alternately, perhaps he would like the government to get much more actively involved in promoting religion, but is afraid to give real examples of what that would look like.

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Filed under Ken Buck

Christine O’Donnell Introduced to Concept of ‘Separation of Church and State’ for the First Time

The stupid,  it hurts…

New York Magazine

Christine O’Donnell was a Constitutional Government fellow at the Claremont Institute, and talks about her love of the Constitution all the time, so we know she is pretty much an expert on the Constitution. But even she was stumped by a complicated and often overlooked passage from the document when it came up during a debate with her Senate opponent, Chris Coons, earlier today.

Coons said private and parochial schools are free to teach creationism but that “religious doctrine doesn’t belong in our public schools.”

“Where in the Constitution is the separation of church and state?” O’Donnell asked him.

When Coons responded that the First Amendment bars Congress from making laws respecting the establishment of religion, O’Donnell asked: “You’re telling me that’s in the First Amendment?” ….

“You actually audibly heard the crowd gasp,” Widener University political scientist Wesley Leckrone said after the debate, adding that it raised questions about O’Donnell’s grasp of the Constitution.

Raised questions? No. There are no questions. For someone hoping to serve in the Senate of the United States, saying “You’re telling me that [the establishment clause is] in the First Amendment?” is like a prospective astronaut saying, “You’re telling me we can’t breathe in space?” It’s like a heart surgeon walking into the operating room and asking, “You’re telling me there are four chambers in the pumpy thing?” And so on.

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Filed under U.S. Politics