Racism

Activist Perfectly Exposes CNN’s Racist Double Standard (VIDEO)

 ADDICTING INFO

It’s not a terribly difficult concept to grasp: White crime is treated verrrrrry differently than black crime by the “liberal” media. But, for some strange reason, (white) people seem shocked and dismayed when activists mention this glaring discrepancy. It’s almost like they don’t want to know about it.

Well, tough noogies because it’s not going away. #BlackLivesMatter has a very long set of legs and shows no signs of slowing down. More importantly, a large part of that movement is changing how the media presents white and black crime. This particular instance of challenging the “liberal” media’s narrative came during an interview with Brian Stelter on CNN as activist Deray McKesson (no stranger to kicking ass on CNN) dissected the news network for the unbalanced depiction of black protests being mostly about violence:

“I wonder, are you saying the press should automatically assume the worst about the officers, about the authorities?, Stelter asked, to which McKesson responded, “I’m saying there should be balance in the way that the critique is spread, and there isn’t.”

McKibbon goes on:

“So when I see broadcasts, news articles that present the police narrative as true,”McKesson added before being interrupted.

“But it is oftentimes true,” Stelter insisted.

“Is it true?” McKesson asked. “I don’t know if it was true with Mike Brown. Maybe we differ on what true means.”

“You’re talking about anecdotes as opposed to statistics,” Stelter replied. “Are you saying the majority of statement by police officers in the U.S. are not true, public statements, press releases.”

If you look carefully, you’ll notice a rather ugly strawman inserted into that exchange. At no point does McKesson say the police are lying all or even most of the time. He simply says that they should be treated with the same critical eye that minorities get. In other words, the media’s narrative is that minorities are always guilty and cops are always right. Or did you think it was a coincidence that the “liberal” media puts so much effort into finding pictures of the dead black person drinking a beer or flashing a “gang sign” to prove that he “had it coming”? It’s pretty obvious what McKesson was saying but Stelter dutifully tried to stick to his narrative anyway.

Aside from that, it’s pretty funny that Stelter has the nerve to talk about statistics. If we’re talking about statistics, we could take a look at all of the cases in which the police kill someone and see how many of those were ruled as “justified”. Oh wait, we can’t because the police deliberately do not keep comprehensive records of that. Imagine that for a second. The police, who happily keep your criminal record on file for decades in case they need to send you to jail again, don’t seem to be able to keep track of how many people they shoot every year. A cynical person would suggest that maybe the police don’t want to leave a record of the trail of dead bodies they’ve left behind. An even more cynical person would suggest that they don’t want to have a record of how many cops were subsequently cleared of any wrongdoing. Considering how few cops ever wind up in court, much less convicted, I feel pretty confidant in stating that the percentage of cops whose shootings are labeled justified (or only worthy of administrative punishment instead of jail time) approaches 99%.

I don’t know about you, but I find that to be about as likely the KKK allowing the entire lineup of the New York Knicks to become members. Still, Mr. Stetler seems amazed at the idea of suggesting that cops might lie.

Another fun bit of statistics is the fact that the “liberal” media in markets like New York somehow still manage to over-report black crime. And this is precisely the kind of media narrative that McKesson is pushing back against. A perfect example of this double-standard is how both the police and the “liberal” media reacted to the biker shoot-out in Texas:

“What we didn’t see [in Waco, Texas] were any dead bodies,” McKesson said. “Nine people were dead, there were 18 people injured and the media didn’t show any of that spectacle of blood. Right? And not that I want to see bloody bodies, but there was a stark difference.”

“And you also saw the bikers chilling [after the shootout],” he remarked. “They are in gangs. This is organized crime. And they are just like hanging out at the police line after nine people are killed, and they’re now saying they might have recovered 1,000 weapons. That context would not happen if those bodies were dark skinned.”

“What’s interesting about Waco is that there was also this nuance suddenly. Because whiteness gets nuance and blackness doesn’t. So you saw with Waco, ‘These are bikers, this is just like a biker group. It’s a biker shootout.’”

I’ve said this many times before: When a white man commits a crime, he’s an individual. When a black man commits a crime, he magically represents ALL black people, everywhere. That’s why the not-at-all-racist talking heads on Fox demand to know where the leaders of the black community are when blacks riot over police brutality, but don’t say a goddamn thing when white kids riot at a freaking pumpkin festival.

‘Murika.

Here’s the video from CNN:

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Why we can’t educate racism away

Want real change? Support a policy shift.

Want real change? Support a policy shift. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

The Week

At its root, racism is a structural problem

How prejudiced are Americans? The internet knows. Whether it’s racism, sexism, cissexism, transphobia, classism, sizeism, or ableism, online residents are watching out for it and pointing it out at tremendous volume. Whole tumblrs are dedicated to meticulously cataloging the prejudiced histories of famous people.

While often useful and necessary, this strategy comes up short. The idea is that by “calling out” individual acts of oppression, we can raise awareness about the myriad subtle ways that prejudice manifests itself. The citizenry, better educated, will adjust its behaviors.

The problem is that white people, our dominant and most privileged socioeconomic group, tend to resist these critiques. In the case of racism, they are the ones who benefit from prejudice, and they squirm out of this stigma in increasingly interesting ways. How? These days, by loudly agreeing with those critiques, thereby signaling that they are meant for other, bad white people.

Think of the guy in critical theory class who embraces radical feminist authors extra-fervently in a bid to escape his own implication in the patriarchy. This bit of political jujitsu is rather “like buying an indulgence,” as Reihan Salam put it at Slate.

One might respond that the answer is improved self-knowledge, greater humility, and more self-flagellation on the part of the privileged (see: #CrimingWhileWhite). Sure. But the problem is that there is no possible demonstration of prejudice and privilege that cannot also be appropriated by white people in the service of demonstrating the purity of their own views, resulting in an endless vortex of uncomfortable, obnoxious earnestness. Being a Not-Racist these days is getting very subtle indeed.

But there’s another approach that is both simpler and far more difficult. Instead of focusing on individual guilt and innocence, the socioeconomic structure that undergirds racism can get equal or greater billing. If educating the privileged has reached a point of diminishing returns, then attacking racist outcomes with structural policy can make that education unnecessary.

Now, it should be noted that any individual instance of calling out prejudice is surely harmless and heartfelt. It should further be noted that many if not most anti-prejudice activists share these structural goals. The problem is a question of emphasis. Prejudiced words tend to get 10 times more attention than racist acts and structures. For example, Donald Sterling was hounded mercilessly for his racist comments, but largely ignored for his concretely racist actions as a landlord.

And the problems America faces go far beyond one rotten rich person. There’s the prison-industrial complex. The stupendous wealth and income gap between black and white. The fact that the police randomly gun down unarmed black men and boys on a regular basis. That’s just for starters — and it’s getting worse, not better.

Working on those problems is going to take a massive nationwide policy effort. Prison and sentencing reform, ending the drug war, overhauling American policing, and implementing quota-based affirmative action would be a good start. In particular, there is a good case for class to take center stage in any anti-prejudice effort. Nearly all racist oppression is heavily mediated through economic structures and worsened by endemic poverty.

More importantly, income differences and poverty are easy problems to fix policy-wise. (Fixing American police is a hellish problem and I have no idea where to start.) But a lack of money can be bridged with simple income transfers, from the rich to the poor.

All of this is very hard lift politically, of course. But substantive politics is the best way to get past people’s nearly infinite capacity for self-exculpation. If the root of racism is in our structures, then structural policy should be the solution.

South Carolina exit polls ask voters whether blacks are getting too uppity about equality

Upset black female (Shutterstock)

In the late 50’s I was a little girl born and raised in the North (NYC) where the racism there was subtle.  For the most part it was not as newsworthy as the southern version of racism.  Although the following was a common occurrence even with United States Supreme Court guidelines against discrimination in place:

Once, I  inquired  about a part-time job when I was 16 years old (this was around 1963).   I spoke to the manager of a realty corp over the phone regarding the available part-time position.    He told me to come in for an interview and when I got there…he said with an apparent look of disappointment, “Oh, you didn’t sound Black over the phone”.  I promptly left.

The Raw Story

An exit poll in South Carolina being criticized after voters in Charleston, Columbia, Greenville, and Spartanburg were asked a series of questions about race and slavery, WSPA reports.

Voters were asked whether “blacks are getting too demanding in their push for equal rights”:

The poll was conducted by a political scientist from Clemson University, David Woodard, who insisted that it was not meant to be provocative.

“It was designed to take advantage of a political moment of Senator Tim Scott’s election as the first African-American from a southern state since reconstruction,” he told WSPA.

But many voters were, in fact, provoked by questions that asked them to “agree” or “disagree” with statements like, “it’s really a matter of some people not trying hard enough; if blacks would only try harder, they could be as well as whites.”

The political scientist who asked them to do so said the questions have been used by pollsters for decades — and they are taken, word-for-word, from the Modern Racism Scale, an analytic tool used to gauge an individual’s non-conscious biases.

This exit poll is not, however, the first time Woodard has stirred up a racially based controversy.

In August, he responded to the student-run “See the Stripes” campaign by calling it a form of “fascism.” The campaign attempted to call attention to the ways in which Clemson University celebrates its slave-owning legacy in building names and statues, by “making a connection between the fields the slaves worked for Master Calhoun and the field on which student-athletes give their time, talent, blood, sweat and tears for The Program.”

“It’s fascism,” Woodard said of it. “It’s looking at things only through racial lenses and not seeing anything else when in fact there is no racism associated with this.”

Woodard plans to release the results from the now-controversial exit polls in January.

Watch a report on the exit polls via WSPA here…

Tea Party star defends absurdly racist campaign flyer

Tea Party star defends absurdly racist campaign flyer

Joe Miller (Credit: AP/Chris Miller)

This guy is back

Salon

Joe Miller’s second attempt to represent Alaska in the U.S. Senate is going even worse than the first

If you spent all of last weekend blissfully living your life without even once coming face-to-face with a campaign flyer depicting Latino people as menacing gangsters covered in tattoos, you probably don’t live in Anchorage, Alaska.

Because if you did live in Anchorage, Alaska, here, via ThinkProgress, is what you might’ve gotten in your mail over the weekend, from former and current GOP Senate candidate Joe Miller:

Attempting to defend himself against charges that showing a bunch of Latino gangsters alongside a warning of “20 million illegals” voting to abolish the Second Amendment is pretty racist, Miller said during a weekend television debate that he was simply confronting a “clear correlation.”

“If you end up granting amnesty to those who don’t value gun rights, who have not been raised in an environment where the Second Amendment is cherished — is considered to be a God-given right — the reality is over a generation or two, the likelihood is very strong that the Second Amendment will not be here,” Miller explained. “We have violent thugs coming across our border and doing violent things,” he went on to say.

In any event, those who believed (and hoped) his embarrassing 2010 campaign was the last American politics would see of Joe Miller were clearly and unfortunately very wrong. The good news? He’s running third in the GOP primary so — fingers crossed — this may finally be his swan song.

Paul Ryan’s race flap even worse than it looks

Paul Ryan's race flap even worse than it looks

Paul Ryan (Credit: AP/Jacquelyn Martin)

Salon

The notion that Ryan was dog-whistling to racists is actually the best-case scenario. Here’s the scary alternative

I spent a depressing amount of time this weekend trying to think up a scenario in which someone might say the following without being motivated, to at least some degree, by malign intent.

“We have got this tailspin of culture, in our inner cities in particular, of men not working and just generations of men not even thinking about working or learning the value and the culture of work, and so there is a real culture problem here that has to be dealt with.”

What I came up with was strained and unlikely, but troubling if true.

In case you slept through last week, the person who said this was congressman and one-time GOP vice-presidential candidate Paul Ryan. It ignited a fairly heated debate over whether he was intentionally trafficking in racial code words to pander to white conservatives. Ryan claims he spoke inarticulately and was thus misunderstood. For proponents of the dog-whistle theory, the fact that Ryan cited Charles Murray, author of “The Bell Curve,” was the smoking gun.

For my part, I don’t think they need a smoking gun, because Occam’s razor does all the dirty work. You can take Murray completely out of the equation and the likelihood that Ryan wasn’t at least subconsciously playing to the prejudices of resentful or racist whites is pretty low.

But let’s assume Ryan’s playing it straight, and his defenders, like Slate’s Dave Weigel, are correct when they argue that this is just how Ryan and other conservatives “think about welfare’s effects on social norms.” If that’s true, it’s actually a bigger problem for the right. If Ryan was even a little bit aware of how people would interpret his remarks, or understood the reaction to them when it exploded online, we could just say that some conservatives want to play the Southern Strategy at least one more round, and leave it at that. Close the book on this controversy, without drawing any larger conclusions about the state of conservative self-deception.

But if Ryan genuinely stumbled heedless into a racial tinderbox then it suggests he, and most likely many other conservatives, has fully internalized a framing of social politics that wasdeliberately crafted to appeal to white racists without regressing to the uncouth language of explicit racism, and written its origins out of the history. If that’s the case it augurs poorly for those in the movement who are trying to broaden the Republican Party’s appeal, because it’s easier to convince people to abandon a poor tactic than to unlearn rotten ideology.



In his 1984 book “The Two Party South,” political scientist Alexander Lamis quoted a conservative operative later revealed to be Ronald Reagan confidant Lee Atwater, who traced the evolution.

”You start out in 1954 by saying, ‘N—-r, n—-r, n—-r,’” Atwater explained. “By 1968 you can’t say ‘n—-r’ — that hurts you. Backfires. So you say stuff like forced busing, states’ rights and all that stuff. You’re getting so abstract now [that] you’re talking about cutting taxes, and all these things you’re talking about are totally economic things and a byproduct of them is [that] blacks get hurt worse than whites. And subconsciously maybe that is part of it. I’m not saying that. But I’m saying that if it is getting that abstract, and that coded, that we are doing away with the racial problem one way or the other. You follow me — because obviously sitting around saying, ‘We want to cut this,’ is much more abstract than even the busing thing, and a hell of a lot more abstract than ‘N—-r, n—-r.”’

Treating intergenerational laziness of inner-city men as established truth, and bemoaning the ways social spending programs supposedly nurture that “culture,” blends seamlessly into Atwater’s framework.

Weigel interprets the fact that Charles Murray has lately softened his claims as exculpation for Ryan and other conservatives who cite him. But Murray’s just following a social Darwinist’s rendition of the trajectory Atwater traced. I suspect both men are wiser to their intentions than their apologists give them credit for. There are ways to promote conservative social policies that aren’t remotely racialized — they just don’t ignite the passions of resentful white people in a politically meaningful way. If I’m wrong, though, conservatives better hope the party doesn’t nominate Ryan or any like-minded thinkers in 2016.

A quick point of trivia: I first learned about Atwater’s comments years ago, in this New York Times column by Bob Herbert questioning why anybody was surprised to hear GOP education secretary-cum-talk radio host Bill Bennett say, “I do know that it’s true that if you wanted to reduce crime, you could — if that were your sole purpose — you could abort every black baby in this country, and your crime rate would go down. That would be an impossible, ridiculous and morally reprehensible thing to do, but your crime rate would go down.”

Guess whose program Ryan was a guest on when he stepped in it last week?

South Texas Senate hopeful slammed for racial slur

Sharon Hall, field representative for Houston Sen. Dan Patrick, visits with U.S. Senate candidate Chris Mapp at a Republican candidates forum in the New Braunfels Civic Center on Jan. 28, 2014. | Photo: San Antonio Express

Some Republicans refuse to hide their prejudices and hatred for “the other”.  Chris Mapp, a Texas hopeful for a seat in the U.S. Senate is just one of them.  We’ll be keeping an eye on this guy during the run-up to the March 4th primary…

My San Antonio

A Republican hopeful for the U.S. Senate who used a racial slur to describe undocumented immigrants has defended the language as “normal” in South Texas.

Chris Mapp, a Port O’Connor businessman, stood by his comments that “wetbacks” should be shot by ranchers and that President Barack Obama is a “socialist son of a bitch” — remarks that have created a national stir among both parties.

“That kind of rhetoric is discouraging from anybody,” U.S. Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, said during a visit to a San Antonio charter school Friday. “I recognize this is a free country but that’s not the sort of way to gain people’s confidence that you care about them and you want to represent their concerns in the halls of Congress.”

Mapp, 53, first made the remarks at an editorial board meeting with the Dallas Morning News last week, but told the San Antonio Express-News on Friday that using the derogatory term for Mexican immigrants is as “normal as breathing air in South Texas.”

He said he was discussing immigration policy and that the Dallas editorial board didn’t include all of his statements.

“We can’t have illegal immigrants, drug cartels, human traffickers or terrorists coming across our border,” he said. “Our borders can either be sealed by choice or force, and so far choice hasn’t worked.”

“That is way out of bounds and I can’t imagine many people in Texas, much less Texas Republicans, voting for that guy,” said Robert Stovall, the chairman of the Bexar County Republican Party. “His views are in no way a reflection of the Republican Party nationally, statewide or in Bexar County.”

Diana Arevalo, secretary of the Bexar County Democratic Party, said she’s “offended by his comments and that he doesn’t want to offer an apology to the Latino community and to our president of the United States of America.”

Mapp said farmers with land on the Texas-Mexico border should be allowed to protect it from undocumented immigrants by shooting them. He also said that “a lot of people are here to work” and they deserve that chance.

“This is why we have primaries, so that we can see people’s traits that come out when they are under pressure,” Stovall said. “And in this case, his true colors came out.”

Mapp is in a crowded primary with seven opponents, including Cornyn. Early voting began Tuesday and Election Day is March 4.

After Sarah’s Racial Attack [Yesterday], A Quick Recap of Her Racist Past

I don’t post much about Alaska’s half term Governor,  Sara Palin because the woman is willfully provocative and skilled at rousing her racist base.

However, I believe this excellent compilation of Palin’s racism is an important look into the soul of the Tea Party’s basic ideology…

Daily Kos – Ismay

Cross posted on The Seminole Democrat

Mr. President, in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. and all who commit to ending any racial divide, no more playing the race card,
–Sarah Palin’s words of wisdom for today

Classy, Sarah.  On MLK day, no less.Racists hate being called racists.  Anytime you call them out on their racism, they attack you for “playing the race card.”  And Sarah has had plenty of practice. 

Chris Mathews called Sarah Plain, correctly, the “poster face of racism”.

When Obama defeated Hillary in 2008, her comment was Sambo beat the bitch.

It was Sarah Palin who, with all the subtlety of a wrecking ball, started the Muslim traitor “palling around with terrorists” theme that quickly engulfed the McCain campaign.  Those that questioned her racial baiting weren’t from “the real America” and she spoke fondly of the “pro-America areas of this great nation” (wink, wink).

She has claimed that Obama is single-handedly leading this country to ruin, yet simultaneously says he’s a lazy black guy.

She once said that black people don’t understand the word slavery; while lecturing people last year that slavery was just like our national debt.  (And preceded her idiotic statement “This isn’t racist, but…”)

As governor, she refused to recognize Juneteenth (which is Freedom Day for slaves) in violation of Alaska law and refused to do it even after she got sued for failing to carry out her gubernatorial duties.

Alaska is a state where 35% of the people are black, Asian, or Alaskan native, yet she couldn’t find one minority to put on her staff and worse, said “she didn’t have to.”

She fiercely  defended Rush Limbaugh’s racism, the “duck dynasty” bigot who thought blacks were better off under Jim Crow, and defended Laura Schlesinger for using the n-word 11 times in a racist rant.  (I’m sure she only got upset when she found out Laura earlier called her a moron.)

And this is just a partial list concerning her disregard for African Americans.  Jews, Muslims, gays, Asians, Hispanics all had their turn.  But its really all of their fault for playing the race card and trying to “divide” us.

Poor Sarah.  Why can’t she just insult and degrade you people IN PEACE!!?!

8:50 PM PT: Snopes gave the “sambo” comment an undetermined rating since it was referenced by a single source.  I find it plausible given all her other items, but you could give her the benefit of the doubt on that one.

Read also:

What Sarah Palin gets totally wrong about MLK Day and the ‘race card’ – The Week

Teacher Tells Student: ‘We Do Not Need Another Black President’

20081105_obamasmile_560x375

Barack Hussein Obama – 44th President of the United States

This is the 21st century yet certain groups would rather see this country return back to the 18th century.

Liberals Unite

The 24 hour magazine for discerning Liberals

A young, African-American boy in Fairfield, Ohio had his presidential aspirations stomped on when his teacher, Gil Voigt, repeatedly told him, “we do not need another black president.” Voigt has been suspended.

According to Fairfield school board President, Dan Murray, Voigt’s suspension is the first step in permanently getting rid of him.

“He was talking to some students and said some things that were racially insensitive. We take diversity in our school district very seriously with tolerance of people who are different. We just felt this teacher had crossed the line,” Murray said.

Source: Journal News

Oh, but in case you think the school board is reacting in a quick and timely manner, this is Voigt’s fourth time in front of the board.

(Superintendent Paul) Otten said Voigt had been reprimanded for racially insensitive remarks in the past. A report prepared by Assistant Superintendent Roger Martin lists four instances of discipline: A verbal warning in April 2008 for an “inappropriate racial comment,” another in November 2008 for “improper use of school technology” and a third in December 2013 for “inappropriate comments to students.” He also received a written warning last month for “failure to use adopted curriculum.”

Voigt, who works for Fairfield Freshman School, earns $73,566 per year, makes almost 75% more than the average Ohio state employee and toward the top of the range for Ohio teachers.

Voigt isn’t the first Ohio teacher to be disciplined for racism. On Halloween, Akron’s David Spondike took to Facebook to rant about a teen who urinated in front of some trick-or-treaters. He posted:

I don’t mind if you come to my neighborhood from the ghetto to trick-or-treat. But when you whip out your teeny dicks and piss on the telephone pole in front of my yard and a bunch of preschoolers and toddlers, you can take your nigger-ass back where it came from. I don’t have anything against anyone of any color, but niggers, stay out!

He claimed he wasn’t racist, though:

“Racism” implies prejudging, which is clearly not what happened here. Making any excuse for allowing one race to use a word and condemning another race for using the same word is institutionalized racism in and of itself, regardless of the justification used.

Spondike’s future is still uncertain and Voigt has 10 days from the time of notification to appeal his suspension.

H/t: TW

Racist Tea Partiers Claim African Americans Take Advantage of Slavery

racism-builtit

Politicus USA

Human beings like to commemorate or celebrate a past important event that occurred on the same date of the year as the initial event to either remind themselves of something they never want to repeat, or fondly recall a better time in their lives. This past week an anniversary came and went that should be a reminder of a shameful practice that lingered in America 89 years after Founding Father Thomas Jefferson wrote that “all men are created equal,” and the day should have celebrated that slavery finally came to an official end. The 13th Amendment ended slavery in America in 1865, and the day was remembered by a teabag leader who admonished African Americans to stop complaining their ancestors were indentured servants.

Americans are typically not welcoming to immigrants to this country, and many different groups who came seeking a better life were discriminated against whether they were Italians, Asians, Russians, Hispanics, Germans, or Irish, but they were never bought and sold, kept as property, or treated like Africans who did not come to this country of their own accord or to seek a better life. Despite historical records documenting the horrid treatment of Africans captured in their native lands, shipped to America, and sold to Americans who literally treated them worse than draft animals, there has always been a segment of the population attempting to delegitimize the horrors of slavery. Indeed, there are still racists in America who regard African Americans as inferior, and they celebrate and mourn their loss in the  Civil War the Confederacy fought to preserve their right to keep other human beings to buy, sell, and toil to increase the wealth of white people.

Last Wednesday, on the anniversary of the official end of slavery in America, a teabag leader from New Mexico sparked a minorcontroversy when she suggested that African Americans take advantage of the horrid legacy of slavery to garner some kind of benefits from the rest of America, probably the government as if it is owed to them. The teabagger, Glynis Racine of the Lincoln County Tea Party Patriots took to social media outlet Twitter to send a message via an image suggesting that African Americans “bitch and moan about how the world owes them a living” because their ancestors were slaves. She also had the temerity to state Irish immigrants’ experience in America was worse than African slaves. The Tweet read, “American history month. Forgotten facts,” and was accompanied with an image that read, “White Irish slaves were treated worse than any other race in the U.S.,” and then “When is the last time you heard an Irishman bitching and moaning about how the world owes them a living?”

Racine deleted the Tweet fairly soon after posting it, but the damage was already done and exposed her as a racist. The implication that African Americans, all African Americans, “bitch and moan” about the world owing them a living is as outrageous as it is racist and infuriating. To make matters worse, Racine responded to her detractors and reiterated that Irish immigrants were treated worse than African slaves and said, “It’s time to move on.” Sadly, her sentiment is not isolated to racist teabaggers and is the kind of fear-mongering and race-baiting Fox News and every Republican candidate for president parroted throughout the primary season in 2012.

Continue reading here…

 

GOP Claims Racism Is Over In Misguided Rosa Parks Tribute (UPDATED)

The Republican National Committee  is woefully out of touch…

The Huffington Post

On Sunday, the Republican National Committee tweeted out an ill-advised tribute to civil rights icon Rosa Parks, praising the late activist for “her role in ending racism.”

The message was widely mocked by Twitter users who pointed out that the end of racism was news to them:

TFC Editor Note:  So the RNC’s amended tweet makes everything ok?  It basically says the same thing as the original tweet.  “Helping to end racism”…I think not.  It STILL exists.