President Barack Obama

Watch President Obama’s Full Interview With Stephen Colbert On ‘The Colbert Report’

The full interview on The Colbert

UPROXX

Shortly after crashing The Colbert Report to deliver his own version of “The Word,” President Barack Obama settled in with longtime faux-combatant Stephen Colbert for a lengthy chat.

The clip above covers the disappointing mid-terms (“the election didn’t go as I would have liked”), where he goes from here, the stunning recent jobs report and growing economy, and many of the factors revolving around the Keystone XL Pipeline.

Throughout the interview, Colbert’s trademark wit and humor were matched only by the President’s charisma — he snuck in a crowd-pleasing remark at nearly ever turn — and the screams of the young audience. After the break, the duo returned to continue their talk, this time discussing whether or not the POTUS still loves his job, his home life, the nuclear launch codes, and the temptation to push the limits of his office’s power.

Prince William Meets With President Obama

 

President Barack Obama meets with Britain’s Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington on December 8, 2014. | White House Photo

TIME

Prince William met President Obama for the first time Monday during the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge’s first official trip to the USA.

The Duke of Cambridge travelled to Washington to briefly meet with the President before speaking at the 3rd Biennial Meeting of the International Corruption Hunters Alliance, hosted by the World Bank. As the President of United for Wildlife, the Duke is expected to speak about the illegal animal trade in wildlife parks.

Prince William joked with the President that in all the fuss surrounding the 2013 birth of his son, George, “I didn’t work out whether it was a boy or a girl.” “You forgot to ask?” the President joked, according to The Telegraph. Prince George did not make an appearance this trip.

Kate Middleton did not accompany her husband to Washington D.C., and instead stayed in New York to visit Harlem’s Northside Center for Child Development with NYC First Lady Chirlaine McCray. The Duchess, who is five months pregnant with the couple’s second child, wore a Goat branded coat to meet McCray. The pair spent the morning wrapping Christmas gifts with the children.

10 things you need to know today: December 3, 2014

The man who would be Sec Def. 

The man who would be Sec Def. AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

The Week

Obama picks Ash Carter as Defense secretary, Russia heads into a recession, and more

1. Obama to nominate former Pentagon official Ashton Carter to replace Hagel
President Barack Obama has picked Ashton Carter, a former high-ranking Pentagon official, to replace Chuck Hagel as Defense secretary, Obama administration officials said Tuesday. Hagel got the job over Carter in 2013, and later in the year Carter left due to a rift between the two. This time he was the last top prospect not to drop out of the running. A formal announcement is expected in days, after Carter is vetted. Carter is respected by Republican hawks, which is expected to help in confirmation hearings. [Politico, The New York Times]

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2. Russia enters recession as oil prices fall
Plummeting oil prices are pushing the Russian economy into a recession, officials in Moscow announced Tuesday. Russian leaders had been expecting their economy to grow in 2015 — but that was when they were assuming oil would remain at $100 a barrel. Revised estimates show that the country’s economy will contract by 0.8 percent if prices hover around $80 per barrel. With the ruble losing value and oil now around $71 per barrel, Moscow says under a more “pessimistic” scenario, with $60-per-barrel oil, its economy could drop by up to 4 percent. [CNN]

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3. Boehner argues against government shutdown over immigration
House Speaker John Boehner on Tuesday urged fellow Republicans to avoid a government shutdown by approving a long-term government spending bill next week. Many conservatives want to use the bill to deny money the Homeland Security Department needs to carry out President Obama’s executive order shielding as many as 4.7 million undocumented immigrants from deportation. Boehner reportedly argued for funding most federal programs through September, and revisiting Homeland Security’s budget in 2015, when the GOP will control the Senate. [Reuters]

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4. Police investigate Michael Brown’s stepfather for remarks during riot
St. Louis County police said Tuesday they were investigating Louis Head, the stepfather of Michael Brown, to see whether angry remarks he made incited rioting on the night a grand jury decided not to indict the white police officer who shot and killed the unarmed black teenager in August. A video reportedly surfaced in which Head tells an angry mob, “burn this bitch down,” shortly before protesters began burning cars. Police said the inquiry was part of a broader investigation of the violence. [The New York Times]

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5. Detroit public buildings lose power
A power outage caused by a “major cable failure” cut off electricity to Detroit’s fire stations, schools, and other public buildings on Tuesday. Traffic signals and the city’s People Mover shut off downtown, and firefighters spent much of the day rescuing people from elevators stuck in public buildings. The outage affected more than 900 sites, with some going without lights all day after the grid shut down around 10:30 a.m. [Detroit Free Press]

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6. Netanyahu fires two ministers and calls for early elections
Israel’s coalition government collapsed on Tuesday when Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu fired his finance and justice ministers, Yair Lapid and Tzipi Livni, saying they had “harshly attacked” him and his government. Netanyahu called for dissolving the Knesset, Israel’s parliament, andholding elections two years early so that he can get “a clear mandate to lead Israel.” The parties of Lapid and Livni had clashed with Netanyahu over a host of issues, most recently a proposed law declaring Israel a Jewish state. [BBC News]

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7. Hong Kong protest founders announce their “surrender”
Three founders of Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement announced that they would “surrender” to police on Wednesday. The trio — Occupy Central leader Benny Tai, and co-founders Chan Kin-man and Chu Yiu-ming — tearfully urged protesters to retreat from three major intersections they have been blocking since late September. While some protesters called the move a “betrayal,” teenage protest leader Joshua Wong, who began a hunger strike on Monday, praised Tai for his role starting the movement, and said the fight for free elections in the Chinese-run city would continue. [Agence France Presse]

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8. CDC considers call for stressing circumcision health benefits
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is proposing federal recommendations that would state that all males, including teenage boys, should be counseled on the health benefits of circumcision. Studies in Africa over the last 15 years indicate that circumcision lowers men’s risk of HIV infection from heterosexual intercourse by 50 to 60 percent. The procedure also reduces the risk of herpes and human papillomavirus. The American Academy of Pediatrics said in 2012 that circumcision’s benefits outweigh its risks. [NPR]

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9. Woman sues Cosby, accusing him of sexual assault at the Playboy Mansion
A 55-year-old California woman, Judy Huth, filed a lawsuit against Bill Cosby on Tuesday, accusing the embattled comedian of sexually assaulting her at the Playboy Mansion in 1974, when she was 15. In the lawsuit, Huth says she and a friend met Cosby at a park, and that the assault occurred after Cosby gave her alcohol. The suit was the latest in a flurry of rape accusations against Cosby. Lawyers for Cosby, who has resisted commenting on the allegations, were not immediately available for comment. [Los Angeles Times]

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10. Rolling Stones sax player Bobby Keys dies
Bobby Keys, who played on-and-off with the Rolling Stones for decades, died on Tuesday at his Tennessee home after a long illness. He was 70. Keys played memorable sax solos on such Stones hits as Brown Sugar, Can’t You Hear Me Knocking, and Sweet Virginia. He also contributed to John Lennon’s Whatever Gets You Through the Night. “I have lost the largest pal in the world,” the Stones’ Keith Richards wrote in a statement, “and I can’t express the sense of sadness I feel, although Bobby would tell me to cheer up.” [The Associated Press]

GOP Lie Debunked: Every President Since Eisenhower Used Executive Authority On Immigration

obama-big-point

Obama – Immigration

PoliticusUSA

For any American who has been conscious over the past six years, the idea of a Republican, or any iteration thereof, displaying tenderness, compassion, and empathy for people is laughable if not a complete fallacy; especially people who are suffering or in some way distressed. If anything, Republicans and their cohorts are inhumane by choice, and next to being hypocrites, rivals their racism as major defining characteristics of the entire conservative movement. Since President Obama announced he was fed up, like a majority of Americans, waiting for Republicans to take action on immigration reform, Republicans revealed, in grand fashion, their inhumanity, racism, and hypocrisy in their outrage over executive action on immigration.

Even before the President threatened he would use his authority as head of the Executive branch to “reform” immigration enforcement policy if Republicans failed to act, all manner of conservatives called such a move unprecedented, outrageous, and a gross display of Presidential overreach. They have since threatened impeachment, a lawsuit, eliminating executive authority for President Obama, and force the government to shutdown if the African American President dared do what Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, and George W. Bush did in regards to immigration; use executive authority in a humane act towards immigrants.

Now, Republicans will never admit it, but their man-turned-god, Ronald Reagan, was the first Republican president to take executive action on immigration to put a screeching halt to his party’s inhumane treatment of Hispanic immigrants. In 1986, Ronald Reagan signed the what would prove to be the last comprehensive immigration reform bill to pass Congress. The legislation, the Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) granted up to 3 million undocumented immigrants a path to citizenship if they had lived in America “continuously” since 1982, or four years; nearly identical to President Obama’s proposal for comprehensive immigration reform Ted Cruz will not let House Republicans debate or vote on.

There was a problem with the new immigration law that bothered Reagan’s conscience because it did not include spouses and children of the 3 million immigrants the law affected. At the time, the Senate Judiciary Committee said that the “families of legalized aliens would be required to ‘wait in line.” This abomination of “split-eligibility families” also wore on the consciences of the U.S. Council of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) that drove them to condemn the separation of families that conflicted with Reagan’s so-called “pro-family” bona fides.

A year later some members of Congress offered up a legislative fix to include the now-legal immigrants’ family members in the IRCA, but it failed. So when Congress failed to do the humane thing and keep immigrant families intact, Ronald Reagan took it upon himself and changed the policy under executive authority, and “prosecutorial discretion” to extend the protections against deportations. Not surprisingly,  there was no outrage, claims of presidential overreach, threats of impeachment, lawsuits against Reagan, government shutdowns, or summary elimination of his use of executive orders. Current Republicans are well-aware of Reagan’s executive action but it was a different story ‘then’ because that president was a white man.

The next white Republican president, George H.W. Bush, took nearly identical executive action in 1989 as his predecessor Reagan without the approval, or input, of Congress. The first President Bush agreed with Reagan, and President Obama, that immigration law “would be enforced humanely” without tearing immigrant families apart. Like his white Republican predecessor, the elder Bush’s executive actions were not unprecedented, outrageous, presidential overreach, and he was not threatened with a lawsuit, government shutdown, impeachment, or summary loss of his executive authority through the budget process.

The next white Republican president, and another less-intelligent but no less compassionate Bush, George W, in 2008 signed into law a humane immigration reauthorization to protect immigrant children from three Central American nations. The bill was co-sponsored by Republicans Jeff Fortenberry of Nebraska, Ileana Ros-Lehtinen of Florida, and Chris Smith of New Jersey. The children get a fair hearing, are placed with family members or appropriate homes to ensure they are not victims of human trafficking.

This is the Bush-Republican law President Obama is following to that has Republicans apoplectic and summoning armed militias, and national guard units to the Southern border.  There were no threats to impeach, sue, shutdown the government, or abolish Bush’s executive authority. In fact, Bush had said a couple of years earlier that “We’re a nation of immigrants, and we must uphold that tradition, which has strengthened our country in so many ways.” The only difference between what President Barack Obama and Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, and George W. Bush did in taking humane action on immigration is that one of those four U.S. presidents (the Black one) is taking unprecedented action and abusing executive authority. That one President is also being threatened with a congressional lawsuit, impeachment, a government shutdown, and loss of executive authority for the high crime and misdemeanor of taking the same humane executive action as three white Republican presidents.

It is noteworthy that every president since and including Republican Dwight D. Eisenhower has taken executive action on immigration without facing threats of lawsuits, government shutdowns, impeachment, or loss of executive authority; because they were white. No American dare ever say the current crop of Republicans, teabaggers, conservative pundits, and conservative media are not inherently racist, hypocritical, and living representations of vile inhumanity. Fortunately, history will portray them for exactly what they are; hypocritical and inhumane racists who hate immigrants just as much as they hate the African American man occupying the White House.

10 things you need to know today: November 15, 2014

Pro-democracy student leaders leave the airport after Chinese officials barred them from a Beijing-bound flight.

Pro-democracy student leaders leave the airport after Chinese officials barred them from a Beijing-bound flight. | (REUTERS/Tyrone Siu)

The Week

Second sign-up season begins for HealthCare.gov, Hong Kong pro-democracy leaders denied entry to Beijing, and more

1. Second sign-up season begins on HealthCare.gov website
A little more than a year after ObamaCare’s rocky rollout, the federal health insurance exchange website opened on Saturday for its second sign-up season. President Barack Obama used his weekly video address to urge Americans to get covered, or re-enroll if they had already used HealthCare.gov. “In part because this law is working, health care prices have grown at their slowest rate in nearly 50 years,” Obama said. [The Associated Press]

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2. Chinese officials deny Hong Kong’s pro-democracy leaders entry to Beijing
Hong Kong student leaders Alex Chow, Eason Chung, and Nathan Law planned to take their demands for free, local elections to the mainland on Saturday, but Chinese authorities instead revoked the men’s return-home cards, barring them from boarding a Beijing-bound flight. The trio represents the Hong Kong Federation of Students, which, along with several other groups, is protesting the Chinese Communist Party’s decision that all candidates for Hong Kong’s chief executive position in 2017 must pass a vetting process. [Time]

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3. Defense Department to boost nuclear spending by nearly $10 billion
Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel announced on Friday that the Defense Department will increase spending on nuclear forces by 10 percent per year for the next five years, which comes out to nearly $10 billion. Hagel ordered two reviews of the U.S. nuclear forces in February, one by Pentagon officials and one by outside experts following reports alleging lapses in leadership, morale, and safety. “The… reviews show that a consistent lack of investment and support for our nuclear forces over far too many years has left us with too little margin to cope with mounting stresses,” Hagel said. [The Associated Press]

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4. Vladimir Putin stations warships off Australia’s coast ahead of G-20 summit
Russian President Vladimir Putin directed four warships to be stationed off the northeastern coast of Australia, in advance of his scheduled attendance at a G-20 summit this weekend in Brisbane. Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott responded by sending three warships of his own to monitor the Russia ones, which are technically in international waters. Abbott accused Putin of “trying to recreate the lost glories of tsarism.” [The Associated Press]

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5. House passes bill approving Keystone pipeline construction
The U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill on Friday 252-161 allowing the federal government to go ahead with building the Keystone XL oil pipeline, which would move petroleum from Canada to Gulf Coast refineries. But the Democrat-controlled Senate is not expected to give the 60 votes necessary on Tuesday, and even if the bill did reach President Barack Obama’s desk, he has indicated he’d likely veto the legislation. [The New York Times]

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6. USPS names first female Postmaster General
The United States Postal Service announced on Friday that Megan Brennan will take over for retiring Patrick Donahoe as Postmaster General in February. Brennan began working for USPS in 1986 as a letter carrier and rose to chief operating officer in 2010. Brennan will be tasked with leading an agency that suffered a $5.5 billion net loss this fiscal year. [Time]

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7. Top U.S. general arrives in Baghdad to review ISIS operations
General Martin Dempsey arrived in Iraq on Saturday, his first trip there since President Barack Obama approved U.S. troop deployments to the region. “I want to get a sense from our side about how our contribution is going,” Dempsey said, referring to the U.S. military operations against Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria. In addition to air strikes, U.S. forces are carrying out training for Iraqi troops. Obama authorized sending up to 1,500 more U.S. troops to the region, in addition to the roughly 1,500 that are already deployed. [Reuters]

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8. Four out of 10 new marriages involve remarriage
A new study from the Pew Research Center found that 42 million adults married in 2013 had been married before, almost double the number from 1980. Forty percent of all new marriages include at least one previously married spouse. The study credited the results to a rise in divorce rates, but also an aging population, “which not only increase the number of widows and widowers available to remarry, but means people quite simply have more years in which to make, dissolve, and remake unions.” [Pew Research Center]

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9. Extreme storms on Uranus baffling astronomers
A team at the University of California, Berkeley reported on Wednesday that eight storms over the course of two days in August unexpectedly took place on Uranus. One of the storms was the brightest ever captured on the planet, lighting the usually “boring blue dot” up. “Why we see these incredible storms now is beyond anybody’s guess,” Heidi Hammel of the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, said. [UC Berkeley News Center]

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10. Conde Nast settles lawsuit with former interns for $5.8 million
Conde Nast agreed on Thursday to pay $5.8 million to settle a class-action lawsuit filed by thousands of former interns who say they were underpaid during their time at the company. Lauren Ballinger and Matthew Leib, the lead plaintiffs, could receive about $10,000 each, while about 7,500 former interns dating back to June 2007 could receive payments ranging from $700 to $1,900. The company canceled its internship program in June 2013 after the lawsuit was filed. [Reuters, Deadline]

More Than 70 Percent Of Americans Like Their Obamacare Plans

Cathey Park from Cambridge, Mass. shows the words "I Love Obamacare" on her cast for her broken wrist as she waits for President Barack Obama to speak at Boston's historic Faneuil Hall about the federal health care law, Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013.

Cathey Park from Cambridge, Mass. shows the words “I Love Obamacare” on her cast for her broken wrist as she waits for President Barack Obama to speak at Boston’s historic Faneuil Hall about the federal health care law, Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013. | CREDIT: AP PHOTO/CHARLES DHARAPAK

 Think Progress

With the second Obamacare enrollment period set to begin this weekend, there’s at least one piece of good news for proponents of the health care law.

A new Gallup poll found that more than 70 percent of Americans who bought new health insurance plans through the government exchanges earlier this year rated the quality of their health coverage as “good” or “excellent.” Many of those who purchased new health insurance policies through the exchanges also recounted positive experiences and said they experienced a high quality of health care. According to the poll, more than two-thirds of the newly insured expressed plans to renew their exchange policies.

Pollsters conducted interviews between Oct. 22 and Nov. 12 on Gallup Daily Tracking, asking Americans with health insurance if they obtained their coverage this year, and if so, whether they had done so through federal or state exchanges.

Other recent studies conducted by the Urban Institute and the Commonwealth Fund have found similar levels of satisfaction among new Obamacare customers, who largely say they’re better off with their new coverage.

If the early predictions about health insurance rates in the Obamacare marketplaces hold true, those positive reports could continue. Although premiums in the individual market have previously experienced average annual increases of 10 percent, the rates for next year’s Obamacare plans aren’t expected to rise very much. While experts warn that some people who are already enrolled could experience relatively sharp increases if they simply renew their current plans, they say that newer plans entering the marketplaces will be much cheaper.

As the health law’s second open enrollment period begins, continuing to educate uninsured Americans about their options will be the next challenge for federal officials. In a study conducted by the Kaiser Family Foundation earlier this month, researchers found that two-thirds of respondents knew little about the exchanges they could enter to purchase health plans or the subsidies available to those with low or moderate incomes.

However, during an event at the Center for American Progress (CAP) in Washington, D.C. earlier this week, Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell remained optimistic about the health law’s impact among potential enrollees, predicting that 9.1 million people will enroll in a health care exchange this year.

“Will we have challenges? Yes. But the experience is one, overall, that will be a positive one,” Burwell said at the CAP-sponsored event.

The news about consumer satisfaction with Obamacare plans comes amid a period of controversy for the president’s signature health law. A challenge against the law’s subsidies is heading to the Supreme Court. And GOP congressional leaders continue to express outrage over Obamacare architect Jonathan Gruber’s recent comments about the law only being able to pass due to the “stupidity of the American voter.”

Angus King Shames ‘Fox & Friends': ‘Are You That Cruel’ To Take Health Care From The Sick?

Crooks & Liars

Independent Sen. Angus King of Maine on Tuesday confronted the hosts of ‘Fox & Friends’ over their obsessive opposition to President Barack Obama’s health care law.

Independent Sen. Angus King of Maine on Tuesday confronted the hosts of Fox & Friendsover their obsessive opposition to President Barack Obama’s health care law.

During an interview on the Fox News morning show, host Brian Kilmeade pointed out that MIT economist Jonathan Gruber, who helped design the Affordable Care Act, recently told an audience that the law could not have passed if the public became mired in all of the details.

“In terms of risk-rated subsidies, if you had a law which said that healthy people are going to pay in—you made explicit that healthy people pay in and sick people get money, it would not have passed,” he explained. “Lack of transparency is a huge political advantage. And basically, call it the stupidity of the American voter or whatever, but basically that was really, really critical for the thing to pass.”

Gruber added that the entire process would have been transparent in an ideal world, but “I’d rather have this law than not.”

George Mason University Law Professor Ilya Somin noted that it was unfortunately necessary for lawmakers from both parties to leverage political ignorance to get their job done.

“Neither party can afford to abjure this vital political tool,” Somin wrote. “A candidate or party unwilling to manipulate voter ignorance labors at a systematic disadvantage relative to more unscrupulous opponents.”

Kilmeade wanted to know if King was “as outraged as most of America” over Gruber’s admission.

King said that he did not endorse Gruber’s remarks, and argued that there was no “deep, dark conspiracy.”

“Senator, he said he wasn’t transparent,” Kilmeade interrupted.

“He was the one that put [the law] together — one of them,” co-host Kimberly Guilfoyle chimed in. “He said, in fact, that they weren’t transparent and forthcoming with the CBO because if they were then the American people would know that, in fact, this was going to be something that was going to tax and penalize them, and they wouldn’t go for it.”

“Wait a minute!” King exclaimed. “Tax and penalize. Hold it, hold it, hold it. We’ve got 8 million people that have insurance now that didn’t before. And don’t lecture me about this because 40 years ago, I had insurance. If I hadn’t had it, it caught a cancer that saved my life. If I hadn’t had insurance, I’d be dead.”

“What does that have to do with it?” Kilmeade asked.

“It has to do with having insurance, man!” King shot back. “If you don’t have insurance, it’s a high risk.”

“They just lied about a health plan to the American people,” Kilmeade argued. “Called the ‘stupidity of the American voter,’ and bragged about the lack of transparency.”

“Listen, this is one guy,” the senator replied. “I don’t know who this guy was. All I know is that it’s important for people to have health insurance. And if you guys are saying people shouldn’t have health insurance, I don’t know where you’re coming from.”

“Are you that cruel?” King wondered.

“My goodness!” Kilmeade gasped.

“We’re not, we’re not cruel,” Guilfoyle insisted. “We’re just looking out for the facts and the information.”

At that point, co-host Steve Doocy ended the health care discussion so he could get King to explain why he said that Democrats were the party of “government itself.”

Kos’ Sunday-Talk-Perspective-please

Daily Kos

On a scale of one to 10, with one being the Super Bowl, and 10 being the Holocaust, this week’s mid-term elections went past 11! (PM EST)Despite some early signs that Senate Democrats might live to fight another day, shortly before midnight, that dream turned into a nightmare.

Democrats then found themselves in a state of disarray, and quicklybegan to rend their garmentstoo quickly, if you ask me.

History has shown us that it wasn’t over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor—and it ain’t over now!

Barack Obama is still president, and barring impeachment, he will remain president for another two years—leaving plenty of time for our new Republican overlords to implodeunder the weight of their own stupidity.

Morning lineup:

Meet The Press: Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R); Rep.-Elect Gwen Graham (D-FL); Sen.-Elect Mike Rounds (R-SD); Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz; Roundtable: Jose Diaz-Balart (Telemundo), Amy Walter (Cook Political Report), Democratic StrategistStephanie Cutter and Former House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-VA).Face The Nation: President Barack Obama (D); Former President George W. Bush(R); Roundtable: Peggy Noonan (Wall Street Journal), Bob Woodward (Washington Post), Harvard University Prof. David Gergen and Michele Norris (NPR).

This Week: Main Guests TBD; Roundtable Greta Van Susteren (Fox News), Democratic Strategist Donna Brazile, John Heilemann & Mark Halperin (Bloomberg Politics) andBen Smith (BuzzFeed).

Fox News Sunday: Sen.-Elect Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV); Sen.-Elect Cory Gardner(R-CO); Sen. John Barrasso (R-WY); Rep. Xavier Becerra (D-CA); Roundtable: Brit Hume (Fox News), Peter Baker (New York Times), Former HP CEO Carly Fiorina andCharles Lane (Washington Post).

State of the Union: Sen. Chris Coons (D-DE); Rep. Steve Israel (D-NY); Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-MN); Rep.-Elect Brendan Boyle (D-PA); Rep.-Elect Carlos Curbelo (R-FL); Rep.-Elect Ruben Gallego (D-AZ); Rep.-Elect Lee Zledin (R-NY); Sen. John Thune(R-SD); Sen. Chris Murphy (D-CT).

Evening lineup:

60 Minutes will feature: an interview with Secretary for Veterans Affairs Robert McDonald (preview); an inisde look at a new American-built health care center in Monrovia, Liberia (preview); and, an interview with country music star Blake Shelton (preview).

10 things you need to know today: October 25, 2014

A woman cries during a vigil for those affected by the Friday shooting at Marysville Pilchuck High School.

A woman cries during a vigil for those affected by the Friday shooting at Marysville Pilchuck High School. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

The Week

Two dead in Seattle-area high school shooting, Dallas nurse declared Ebola-free, and more

1. Two dead, including gunman, in Seattle-area high school shooting
A student shot five people, killing one of them, at Marysville Pilchuck High School on Friday morning. Police confirmed that the gunman, identified as Jaylen Fryberg, also died of a self-inflicted gunshot. Several students told media affiliates that the shooting began in the high school’s cafeteria. Three of the shooting victims are reportedly in critical condition, while a fourth has non-life-threatening injuries. [CNN, The Washington Post]

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2. Dallas nurse diagnosed with Ebola declared ‘virus free’
Nina Pham, one of two Dallas nurses who contracted the Ebola virus while caring for Liberian national Thomas Eric Duncan, was declared “virus free” by officials at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, on Friday. Later in the day, Pham met and hugged President Barack Obama at the White House. “I feel fortunate and blessed to be standing here today,” Pham said in a statement. A second nurse, Amber Vinson, is still being held at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, where officials say she is “making good progress.” [The Washington Post]

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3. Iran executes woman who allegedly killed her attempted rapist
Iran executed Reyhaneh Jabbari, 26, on Saturday. Jabbari was sentenced to death in 2007 following a “flawed investigation and unfair trial,” according to Amnesty International. Morteza Abdolali Sarbandi, a former employee of Iran’s Ministry of Intelligence and Security, allegedly hired Jabbari for an interior design project, but Jabbari told officials that Sarbandi tried to sexually assault her while she was in the home, at which point she stabbed him. Amnesty International says Jabbari was subsequently placed in solitary confinement for two months, during which time she was tortured and denied access to an attorney. [CNN]

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4. Police arrest suspect in shooting of three California deputies
Police arrested a suspected gunman who shot and killed two California sheriff’s deputies, and wounded one more deputy along with a civilian motorist, during a shooting spree on Friday in Sacramento. Marcelo Marquez allegedly first shot and killed Sacramento Deputy Danny Oliver when he approached the car Marquez and a female companion were in on Friday morning. The suspects then fled, carjacking at least two vehicles, shooting the driver of one who refused to give up his keys, and also shooting two Placer County sheriff’s deputies who joined the search for the pair. One, Homicide Detective Michael David Davis Jr., died later Friday from his injuries. [The Sacramento Bee]

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5. Surgeons perform first successful ‘dead heart’ transplant
A team at St. Vincent’s hospital in Sydney, Australia, announced on Friday that they had successfully transplanted hearts which had stopped beating for 20 minutes into three patients. Two of the patients have reportedly recovered well, while a third is still in intensive care. The procedure was made possible thanks to the development of a solution that keeps the submerged hearts preserved, and a circuit that attaches to the organs to keep them beating and warm. The procedure could save the lives of 30 percent more heart transplant patients. [The Guardian]

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6. Amazon writes off $170 million on underselling Fire Phone
While Amazon did not include its Fire Phone’s writedown in its third-quarter earnings statement, chief financial officer Tom Szkutak said in a Thursday earnings call that the “consolidated segment operating loss includes charges of approximately $170 million, primarily related to the Fire Phone inventory evaluation and supplier commitment cost.” Amazon launched the device as a competitor to the iPhone and other high-end smartphones in June, but poor user reviews hampered the Fire Phone’s success. The company may have as many as 300,000 unsold Fire Phone units in its warehouses. [The Guardian]

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7. DHS reportedly relying on expired Ebola prevention materials
The Department of Homeland Security promised that it is “satisfied” with its store of Ebola prevention materials on Friday, but testimony from Inspector General John Roth suggests otherwise. Roth appeared at a House oversight hearing on Ebola, and he said, “much of (the DHS’) material has a ‘finite shelf life’ — including thousands of bottles of hand sanitizer, some up to four years expired, and 200,000 respirators that are beyond their five-year usability guarantee.” DHS has spent millions of dollars in recent years on pandemic protective equipment and antiviral drugs for emergency workers. [Fox News]

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8. Stock market closes out best week in nearly two years
Boosted by strong quarterly earnings from large U.S. companies such as Microsoft, the stock marketclosed out on Friday with its best week since January 2013, as the S&P 500 rose 4.1 percent. Companies are also reporting their quarterly results right now, which means Wall Street is able to focus on “earnings expectations and corporate fundamentals,” Michael Arone, chief investment strategist at State Street Global Advisors, said. [The Associated Press]

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9. Kansas City Royals win Game 3, take 2-1 World Series lead
After losing Game 1, the Kansas City Royals have come roaring back, winning Wednesday’s Game 2 and now Friday’s Game 3 to take a 2-1 lead over the San Francisco Giants in the World Series. Kansas City won 3-2 on Friday; the teams face off again in San Francisco tonight. [ESPN]

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10. Queen Elizabeth sends her first tweet
Queen Elizabeth had never sent a tweet from the royal family’s official Twitter account — until Friday. Up popped a tweet reading, “It is a pleasure to open the Information Age exhibition today at the @ScienceMuseum and I hope people will enjoy visiting. Elizabeth R.” The account sent a followup message confirming that Queen Elizabeth had indeed typed the lines, and it even added a hashtag for other users to pick up: #TheQueenTweets. [TheWeek.com]

10 things you need to know today: October 18, 2014

Staff from Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital, in Dallas, hold signs of support for Ebola patient Nina Pham.

Staff from Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital, in Dallas, hold signs of support for Ebola patient Nina Pham. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)

The Week

President Obama appoints Ron Klain ‘Ebola czar,’ the Supreme Court rules that Texas can enforce its voter ID law, and more

1. President Obama names Ron Klain ‘Ebola czar’
President Barack Obama appointed Ron Klain the administration’s “Ebola czar” on Friday. Klain will be responsible for ensuring the government response to any threat of a U.S.-based Ebola outbreak is handled correctly. Formerly chief of staff to Vice President Joe Biden, Klain also helped Obama prepare for presidential debates. He is president of Case Holdings and general counsel for Revolution, an investment firm. [CNN]

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2. Supreme Court rules that Texas can enforce voter ID law
The Supreme Court ruled early Saturday morning that Texas can go ahead with S.B. 14, its voter ID law that has been called one of the toughest in the United States. A federal judge had found the law to be unconstitutional, but a lower appeals court put that ruling on hold. Echoing three other voter ID cases (Ohio, North Carolina, Wisconsin) on which it has ruled in past months, the Supreme Court did not offer a reasoning behind the ruling. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg dissented, along with Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan. [The Washington Post]

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3. Nigeria brokers ceasefire with Boko Haram extremists
A top Nigerian military official announced on Friday that the government had reached a ceasefire with Boko Haram’s Islamic extremists, to begin immediately. Air Marshall Alex Badeh, Nigeria’s chief of defense staff, said the ceasefire would “end five years of insurgency that has killed thousands and left hundreds of thousands homeless.” Another government official said the hope was that negotiations for the release of 219 schoolgirls who were kidnapped in April and still being held by Boko Haram could begin this week. [The Associated Press]

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4. Federal judge strikes down Arizona’s ban on gay marriage
A federal judge ruled on Friday that Arizona’s ban on same-sex unions is unconstitutional. U.S. District Court Judge John Sedwick wrote in his brief explaining the decision that a recent appeals court ruled “that substantially identical provisions of Nevada and Idaho law that prohibit same-sex marriages are invalid,” and Arizona would thus follow suit. [The Arizona Republic]

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5. Michael Dunn, the ‘loud music killer,’ sentenced to life in prison
Michael Dunn, who was found guilty of killing unarmed black teenager Jordan Davis in November 2012, was sentenced to life in prison without parole — life plus 105 years — on Friday. Dunn shot Davis, who was 17 at the time, at a Jacksonville, Florida, gas station following an argument about the volume of music emanating from an SUV in which Davis and his friends were sitting. [First Coast News]

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6. NASA discovers one of the farthest galaxies away ever seen
NASA announced on Thursday that it had discovered “one of the faintest galaxies ever seen,” as part of its three-year program to investigate the universe’s formative years. The faint galaxy is about 13 billion light-years away, and it is five hundred times small than the Milky Way, and still evolving. NASA scientists said the discovery was important because it would help inform how galaxies and the universe have evolved over time. [NASA]

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7. Two tourists allegedly snuck onto White House grounds in 2008
In the midst of a deluge of poor publicity for the Secret Service, a new report claims that in the summer of 2008, a pair of German tourists entered the White House grounds after peeling off from a legitimate tour group, only being noticed and then apprehended when they began using unauthorized cameras to take pictures near the White House’s North Portico. The Secret Service subsequently installed “a serpentine bike rack to make it more difficult to enter the White House grounds.” [The Washington Examiner]

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8. Israel has begun construction on vertical cemeteries
Israel has given cemeteries the go-ahead to build vertical burial grounds, even getting approval from rabbis who declared the practice kosher and “effective…in an era when most of the cemeteries in major population centers are packed full.” Yarkon Cemetery, outside Tel Aviv, has begun construction of the vertical plots; now cemeteries in other high-population countries such as Brazil and Japan are following suit. [The Associated Press]

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9. Study: Exercising three times a week lowers risk of depression
A new study published this week in JAMA Psychiatry shows that research subjects who exercised three times per week reduced their risk of depression by 19 percent. And, each additional workout session on top of the base three further reduced the subjects’ depression risk by another six percent. “Importantly, this effect was seen across the whole population, and not just in those at high risk of clinical depression,” Christine Power, a senior author on the study and professor of epidemiology and public health at the Institute of Child Health at UCL, said. [Medical News Today]

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10. Bono reveals the reason for his sunglasses is he has glaucoma
U2 frontman Bono is rarely seen without his signature shades, but he revealed during a taping of BBC One’s Graham Norton Show that the reason for his sunglasses is not fashion-based, but medically necessitated. “I’ve had glaucoma for the last 20 years,” Bono said. “I have good treatments and am going to be fine.” Those who suffer from glaucoma are often sensitive to light, and they wear dark glasses to alleviate the pain. [The Telegraph]

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