Tag Archives: Party leaders of the United States House of Representatives

Holiday Inn Abruptly Ejects Progressive Groups Who Reserved Space For Jobs Rally In Same Hotel As Cantor Event

Well, the Holiday Inn is on my “do not spend your money at this place” list…

Think Progress

Progressive groups organizing a rally at the same Richmond-area hotel where House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-VA) was holding an event Wednesday were abruptly kicked out of the hotel and told by hotel management to remain off of its property during Cantor’s event.

Cantor held an Advisory Council gathering, closed to the media but open to constituents who registered ahead of time, at the Holiday Inn Koger Center in Richmond. A coalition of progressive Virginia organizing groups — Progress Virginia, OurDC, and Virginia Organizing — had booked rooms and a separate ballroom in the hotel to hold a “jobs rally” countering Cantor’s event. According to organizers, the groups planned to invite Cantor to attend their rally after his own event, in the hope that he would listen to their concerns regarding job creation and unemployment.

But just hours before the events were set to begin, the Holiday Inn canceled the groups’ ballroom and room reservations and ordered the groups to remain off of hotel property during Cantor’s meeting. According to organizers, hotel management falsely accused them of smoking in their rooms and used that as justification to cancel their reservations. A representative of Holiday Inn who only agreed speak on the condition of anonymity, however, said the hotel was seeking to avoid confrontation between the progressive groups and those attending the Cantor event. He would not comment on whether the hotel had any communications with Cantor or his staff regarding the progressive groups.

Attempts to reach both Cantor’s office and Holiday Inn’s corporate offices for comment prior to publication were unsuccessful. In an interview with a local news station, Cantor acknowledged that he saw the protesters but said, “I don’t see how that’s productive. … (It was) a very productive event. I’m not quite so sure how that was productive outside.”

After their reservations were canceled, the progressive groups assembled across the street and began marching to the hotel, where they were met by Virginia state police officers and hotel management demanding that they remain off Holiday Inn property. The protesters remained assembled between the Holiday Inn and the street, where they held signs protesting Cantor’s record on job creation and his legislative priorities and chanted that they wanted Cantor to focus on jobs. Multiple protesters told stories of their unemployment over a megaphone as police and hotel management looked on.

The protesters then marched back across the street, out of sight from the hotel, and held a rally similar to the one they had planned inside the hotel, with more stories of unemployment and hardship brought on by the economic recession.

Caveat:  Turn down your speakers before watching the following video…

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Cantor: No Hurricane Emergency Funding W/O Spending Cuts – Democratic Underground

Think Progress

Despite the devastation caused by Hurricane Irene this weekend, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-VA) today stood by his call that no more money be allocated for disaster relief unless it is offset by spending cuts elsewhere. The Washington Post reported this morning that FEMA will need more money than it currently has to deal with the storm’s aftermath and is already diverting funds from other recent disasters to deal with the hurricane, but Cantor’s comments suggest Republicans won’t authorize more funds without a fight.

Cantor took the position following the tornadoes that devastated Joplin, Missouri and elsewhere in the spring and summer, and after last week’s earthquake, the epicenter for which was in his district, but the hurricane’s level of destruction is far beyond that of those disasters. Still, Cantor told Fox News that while “we’re going to find the money,” “we’re just going to need to make sure that there are savings elsewhere to do so.”

Cantor referred a bill the Republican-controlled House passed that approves $1 billion in disaster relief, which was financed by a $1.5 billion cut from loan program to encourage the production of fuel-efficient vehicles. But the need in the wake of the hurricane will likelygreatly surpass $1 billion, and that spending package was supposed to be used for tornado recovery efforts, for which several hundred million dollars has already been outlayed.

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Disaster Funding, Cantor-Style

Representative Eric Cantor of Virginia

Image via Wikipedia

Dave Weigel – Slate

Mineral, Virginia, where yesterday’s earthquake originated, just so happens to be in Eric Cantor’s district. Eric Cantor just so happens to get gotcha’d every time a disaster happens and the media starts looking for budget cuts that look short-sighted from the view inside the rubble. He’s figured out how to handle this:

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor assured his constituents on Wednesday that Congress “will find the monies” to assist earthquake victims in Mineral, Virginia – but the Republican lawmaker noted that “those monies will be offset with appropriate savings or cost-cutting elsewhere.”

One factor that’s been misunderstood in today’s weird Krugman discussion is whether or not Keynesians think natural disaster = growth. Not necessarily — they tee up the conditions under which government and industry will spend new money. They may even create an environment for temporarily deregulation. You want as much relief as possible, followed by as much commerce as possible.

Cantor’s promising… well, for now, disaster relief that will be funded by cuts somewhere else. This is exactly what Faux Krugman was afraid of.

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Earthquake Does Less Damage to Washington than Eric Cantor (Humor)

The Borowitz Report

WASHINGTON (The Borowitz Report) – Seismologists said today that a 5.8 magnitude earthquake centered in Virginia did less damage to Washington, D.C. than House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, also centered in Virginia.

“The earthquake and Eric Cantor originate from almost the identical point,” said Dr. Davis Logsdon of the University of Minnesota’s Seismology Institute.  “But while the earthquake caused some minor shaking, there’s only one word for Eric Cantor’s impact: devastation.”

As residents of Washington picked through the rubble left behind by Rep. Cantor, some questioned whether it made sense to rebuild.

“What’s the point?  Congress will be back from recess in a few days and then he’ll just knock everything down again,” one resident said.

While rumbling from the quake extended to states as far-flung as New York and Ohio, Rep. Cantor’s path of destruction has wreaked damage on almost every state in the country, Dr. Logsdon said.

“The only state he hasn’t destroyed is Wisconsin,” he said. “That’s because there was nothing left of it after it was hit by Scott Walker.”

 

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After Triggering Downgrade, Debt Default Skeptics Try To Run From Their Records — But They Can’t

Are they not aware that this is the digital age and everything they ever said or did is recorded somewhere?

TPMDC

Standard & Poors has a specific justification fordowngrading the U.S. bond rating, and it’s deadly for Republicans. It wasn’t just that Congress showed itself to be reckless and dysfunctional, or that the GOP shows no sign of ever ending their anti-tax jihad. It’s that for a period of weeks, some lawmakers (read: Republicans) were quite literally shrugging off the risks of blowing past the August 2 deadline, running out of borrowing authority, and missing payment obligations.

“[P]eople in the political arena were even talking about a potential default,” said Joydeep Mukherji, senior directior at S&P. “That a country even has such voices, albeit a minority, is something notable,” he added. “This kind of rhetoric is not common amongst AAA sovereigns.”

This is unambiguous, and leaves little room for obfuscation. S&P’s original, lengthy statement explaining the downgrade cited political dysfunction in Congress quite broadly, but did not mention this specific element of the debate. For weeks, high-profile conservative lawmakers practically welcomed the notion of exhausting the country’s borrowing authority, or even technically defaulting. Others brazenly dismissed the risks of doing so. And for a period of days, in an earlier stage of the debate, Republican leaders said technical default would be an acceptable consequence, if it meant the GOP walked away with massive entitlement cuts in the end.

Of course, that doesn’t mean the GOP won’t try to sweep the mess they’ve made down the memory hole. Here’s Rep. Tom McClintock (R-CA), who sponsored legislation that would’ve forced the Treasury to prioritize interest payments on U.S. debt in the event of a lapse in borrowing authority. “No one said that would be acceptable,” he said of a default. “What we said was in the event of a deadlock it was imperative that bondholders retain their confidence that loans made to the United States be repaid on schedule.”

That may be true for McClintock. Others were much more relaxed about the consequences of ignoring the August 2 deadline.

House Budget Committee chairman Paul Ryan said if “a bondholder misses a payment for a day or two or three or four,” it’s preferable so long as “you’re putting the government in a materially better position to be able to pay their bonds later on.” (Video below)

Ryan and others, including Sen. Pat Toomey (R-PA), were echoing hedge-fund manager Stanley Druckenmiller, who was quoted in a widely cited Wall Street Journal article. Here’s Toomey: “The most high-profile advocate for this was Stanley Druckenmiller … one of the world’s most successful hedge-fund managers, extraordinarily wealthy from his knowledge of the markets, a big money manager now, and a big holder of Treasury securities — and he has said that he would actually accept even a delay in interest payments on the Treasuries that he holds. And he would prefer that if it meant that the Congress would right this ship.”

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-VA) warned against default, but for a time was willing to go past August 2.

“The markets are not fooled by some date imposed to say that that is the trigger for the collapse,” he said at a Virginia jobs forum in May. “I think the markets are looking to see that there is real reform.”

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Cantor: Entitlement Promises ‘Frankly, Are Not Going To Be Kept For Many’

The continued folly and absurdity of the GOP…

Think Progress

During an interview with the Wall Street Journal, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-VA) said he is ready and willing to slash entitlements like Medicare, because, in his opinion, Americans have to “come to grips with the fact that promises have been made that frankly are not going to be kept for many“:

What we need to be able to do is to demonstrate that that is the better way for the people of this country. Get the fiscal house in order, come to grips with the fact that promises have been made that, frankly, are not going to be kept for many. [...] The math doesn’t lie.

Watch it:

Republicans have been saying for months that they want to preserve programs like Medicare and Social Security for all people over the age of 55, but that those under 55 will have to shift into a different program. But Cantor’s pronouncement is maybe the most explicit explanation that, under the GOP’s vision, the government would be actively reneging on promises made to those who haven’t yet hit the arbitrary age of 55.

Of course, the math would look much better, particularly on Social Security, if the GOP were to back off its insistence that the government not collect a single dime in new revenue. Meanwhile, Jacob Hacker, political science professor at Yale University, has called the GOP’s scheme to raise the Medicare retirement age “the single worst idea for Medicare reform” since it “saves Medicare money only by shifting the cost burden onto older Americans caught between the old eligibility age and the new, as well as onto the employers and states that help fund their benefits.”

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Cantor Opposed Short-Term Debt Ceiling Increase, Now Calls Obama’s Opposition to Short-Term Increase ‘Indefensible’

Up is down, black is white, good is evil and the almighty dollar reigns supreme, only on Wall Street.

Welcome to another “opposite day” in Washington D.C. brought to you by the irascible GOP…

Think Progress

Today, Speaker John Boehner told the House GOP caucus that he is preparing a short-term bill that would raise the debt ceiling for about six months, despite Obama’s pledge to veto such a measure. On the call, Majority Leader Eric Cantor blasted Obama for opposing it. The Wall Street Journal reports:

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor indicated in his remarks during the conference call that Republicans don’t want to give President Barack Obama a debt-ceiling deal that lasts past the 2012 elections. Mr. Cantor called the president’s insistence on a deal that carries through the election purely political and indefensible.

But late last month, Cantor himself vehimently opposed a short term deal:

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor pushed back hard Tuesday against Senate Republican suggestions of a scaled-back, short-term debt deal, saying it’s “crunch time” in White House budget talks and “if we can’t make the tough decisions now, why … would [we] be making those tough decisions later.”

“I don’t see how multiple votes on a debt ceiling increase can help get us to where we want to go,” the Virginia Republican told reporters. “It is my preference that we do this thing one time. … Putting off tough decisions is not what people want in this town.

Standard and Poors, a credit rating agency, agrees that a short term deal would be bad for the nation’s credit. In a July 14 release S&P wrote “We may also lower the long-term rating and affirm the short-term rating if we conclude that future adjustments to the debt ceiling are likely to be the subject of political maneuvering.”

 

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Debt talks shine light on prickly relationship between Obama, Cantor

The term “prickly” is putting it mildly.  Eric Cantor is the unpolished, egotistical school kid in the room trying to make a name for himself.

It appears his lack of understanding of the President’s determination to get the debt ceiling raised is faulty.

Cantor assumed that because Obama has capitulated to so many of the majority’s demands in the past, he would simply do it again.  Cantor’s bully tactics and frankly, total disrespect for the President at Wednesday’s meeting backfired on him.  Clearly, Eric Cantor was not the smartest guy in the room

The Hill

The fractious negotiations over raising the debt ceiling have exposed the prickly relationship between President Obama and House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-Va.).

On Thursday —the day after Obama and Cantor had what all sides seem to agree was a terse exchange at the White House — the Virginia Republican stressed that he had always tried to be substantive in his discussions with the president.

“You would have to ask him what irks him so much about my policy-based discussions,” Cantor told The Hill in a short interview.

While Obama is known to have a chummy rapport with House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio), the president does not seem to have the same kind of working relationship with Cantor.

The interactions between Cantor and Obama have been closely watched ever since Boehner decided last weekend to abandon a $4 trillion deficit-reduction package. Since Boehner’s announcement, Cantor has taken a more prominent role in the debt-ceiling negotiations and reportedly asserted his voice in closed-door meetings with the president.

In an interview Thursday, Obama said he’s more than willing to work with Cantor on a deficit-reduction package.

“I am willing to work with everybody, including Eric Cantor, to solve problems. My relationship with all the leaders has been cordial, it has been professional,” Obama told with KYW of Philadelphia.

But even as the president stressed his openness to working with the majority leader, he said Republicans need get to serious about reaching deal.

“I think at a certain point the American people run out of patience if they think people are playing games and not serious in terms of solving problems,” Obama said.

Cantor’s emergence as a leader in the talks seems to have riled the president, who reportedly snapped at the No. 2 Republican on two different occasions this week.

One of the incidents occurred during Wednesday’s session of the debt-ceiling talks. Cantor claimed Obama stormed out of the White House meeting after daring him to call his bluff on rejecting a short-term debt-ceiling increase. Democrats said Obama simply ended a discussion in which Cantor kept interrupting him.

Another sharp exchange reportedly happened during Tuesday’s negotiating session.

According to media reports, Cantor challenged Obama to show him the outline of his “grand bargain” for $4 trillion in deficit savings on paper.

“Frankly, your Speaker has it,” Obama shot back. “Am I dealing with him, or am I dealing with you?”

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‘THIS MAY BRING MY PRESIDENCY DOWN BUT I WILL NOT YIELD’

I don’t necessarily support the POTUS’ proposal to chip away at the Big three…Medicaid, Medicare and Social Security, but I agree with the President when he says he will not yield to GOP demands of “all or nothing”.   Where’s the equal sacrifice here?  Did the GOP leadership honestly think that Obama would cave (as he usually has done in the past?)

I for one, will be sending my small donations to the President every three months!  I think he’s worthy of those donations.  I have faith in him and his ability to win this one (without having to give up a damn thing!)

People have under estimated this president throughout his term.  He has been perceived as weak and caving in to the bullying GOP leadership in the past.

Huffington Post

Lawmakers and the White House had what nearly every party is describing as a “tough” and “testy” meeting on the debt ceiling Wednesday afternoon, culminating in a stormy exchange between President Obama and House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-Va.).

It was the fifth straight day of talks, but the first in which attendees, speaking on background, were willing to admit that steps were taken backwards. According to multiple sources, disagreements surfaced early, in the middle and at the end of the nearly two-hour talks. At issue was Cantor’s repeated push to do a short-term resolution and Obama’s insistence that he would not accept one.

“Eric, don’t call my bluff. I’m going to the American people on this,” the president said, according to both Cantor and another attendee. “This process is confirming what the American people think is the worst about Washington: that everyone is more interested in posturing, political positioning, and protecting their base, than in resolving real problems.”

Cantor, speaking to reporters after the meeting, said that the president “abruptly” walked off after offering his scolding.

“I know why he lost his temper. He’s frustrated. We’re all frustrated,” the Virginia Republican said.

Continue reading here…

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Republicans: Trillions Could Be Cut from Budget if We Eliminate Empathy (Humor)

Talk about satire, The Borowitz Report is among the best on the web now.  Here’s an example:

Humanity Also on Chopping Block

WASHINGTON (The Borowitz Report) – Speaking on behalf of congressional Republicans, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-VA) said today that trillions could be cut from the Federal budget if Congress can agree to eliminate empathy.

“The current budget is bursting at the seams with pet projects that reek of empathy,” Rep. Cantor said.  “As a nation, we can no longer afford to spend money on people’s basic survival needs like a bunch of drunken sailors.”

Rep. Cantor noted that “the word ‘empathy’ comes from the Greek word ‘pathos,’ meaning ‘pathetic’ – and that’s exactly what helping people is: pathetic.”

“We Americans should get out of the habit of using Greek words,” he added.  “Look where it’s gotten the Greeks – straight into bankruptcy.”

Once congressional Republicans eliminate such empathy-laden budget items as lunches for poor children, medicine for the indigent and oxygen for seniors, Rep. Cantor said, “We can move from cutting empathy to cutting humanity.”

With humanity removed from the budget, he said, “That’s where the real savings come in.”

By eliminating the food, medicine and oxygen necessary to sustain human life, “We will reduce the single biggest drain on the U.S. economy: people.”

Ending on an optimistic note, Rep. Cantor said that by eliminating people, “by the middle of this century the United States will be successfully transformed into one big unmanned Predator drone.”

Elsewhere, presidential candidate Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-Minn) today visited historic Monticello, which she called “the home of Jeffrey Dahmer.”

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