National Weather Service

New York City, Philadelphia, Atlantic City Break Temperature Records During December Heat Wave

The New York skyline, including the Empire State Building, is shown in this Dec. 1, 2013 aerial photo. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

We’re experiencing similar temperatures here in Atlanta.  Yet, those climate change deniers (mostly big oil supporters) turn a blind eye to this ever increasing problem…

The Huffington Post

New York City, Philadelphia and Atlantic City, N.J., have broken temperature records during a brief December heat wave.

The National Weather Service says the temperature in Central Park hit a record-setting 65 degrees Saturday. The previous record was 62, set in 2011 and 1923.

Philadelphia and Atlantic City, N.J., reached 67 degrees on Saturday afternoon. That broke Atlantic City’s previous mark of 63 degrees, set in 2011, and bested Philadelphia’s previous high of 66 degrees, set in 1895.

The temperature rose to a balmy 68 in Wilmington, Del., beating the previous mark of 65, set in 1895. And the 64 degrees recorded in Newark, N.J. broke the previous mark of 62, set in 2011.

Sunday is supposed to be even warmer in the region. Temperatures could top 70.

New England Snow Storm: Northeast Braces For Possibly Record-Setting Weather

Could this be the snow blizzard version of Hurricane Sandy?

The Huffington Post

New England braced on Thursday for a possibly record-setting winter storm, with forecasts of up to 2 feet (60 cm) of snow already causing airlines to cancel thousands of flights and utilities to prepare for power outages.

The storm was blowing in from the Midwest where it began dropping snow on the Chicago area on Thursday afternoon. It was due to bring light snow to the Northeastern United States on Friday morning before ramping up to blizzard conditions by afternoon.

In Boston, which was expected to see some of the heaviest snowfall, Mayor Thomas Menino ordered the city’s schools to close on Friday and urged businesses to consider allowing staff to stay home, to reduce the risk of commuters getting stranded.

“We are hardy New Englanders, let me tell you, and used to these types of storms. But I also want to remind everyone to use common sense and stay off the streets of our city. Basically, stay home,” Menino told reporters. “Stay put after noontime tomorrow.”

City officials up and down the northeastern United States were bracing for the storm, readying fleets of plows and salt trucks to keep streets clear, while airport officials advised travelers to try to reschedule flights ahead of the storm.

The National Weather Service said Boston could get 18 to 24 inches of snow (45 to 60 cm) on Friday and Saturday, its first heavy snowfall in two years. Light snow is expected to begin falling around 7 a.m. EST (1200 GMT) on Friday, with heavier snow and winds gusting as high as 60 to 75 miles per hour (95 to 120 km per hour) as the day progresses.

“It’s the afternoon rush-hour time frame into the evening and overnight when the height of the storm will be,” said Kim Buttrick, a meteorologist at the National Weather Service in Taunton, Massachusetts.

Cities from Hartford, Connecticut, to Portland, Maine, expected to see at least a foot of snow.

Airlines have already canceled more than 2,200 flights planned for Friday, according to the website Flight Aware.com, with the largest number of cancellations at airports in Newark, New York, Chicago  .

Nearly 500 flights have been canceled for Saturday, according to the flight-tracking site.

Officials at airports across the region warned travelers to expect more delays and cancellations on Friday.

Continue here…

UPDATES:

breakingweather @ breakingweather : MT @nwsboston: Don’t forget coastal flooding & very high seas a big issue with this storm. http://t.co/mJOwBM5I
1:58 AM – Today
CNN @ CNN : Over 3,000 flights in U.S. canceled Friday and Saturday because of blizzard.http://t.co/zIEsJn3b
1:11 AM – Today
EricHolthaus @ EricHolthaus : Other meteorologists (including myself) are impressed at the storm’s *current* appearance. Explosive growth phase just getting started.
12:47 AM – Today
weatherchannel @ weatherchannel : Development of nor’easter occurring right now off the South Carolina coast. #blizzard #Nemo http://t.co/mJ0QfgFm

Everything you need to know about Winter Storm Nemo

A winter storm is coming — and it’s not going to be anywhere near as cute as its namesake.

FYI for our New England friends and beyond. The Week explains it all…

The Week

February 7, 2013

A storm of “historic” proportions is set to sweep across the northeastern United States, beginning with light flurries on Thursday night and lasting through Saturday evening. The powerful winter weather system is expected to dump snow, sleet, rain, and hurricane-force winds from Connecticut all the way up to Maine. Start stocking up on food and supplies; things could get pretty ugly out there. Here, everything you need to know about Winter Storm Nemo, 2013′s first nor’easter:

How much snow are we talking about?
The National Weather Service says that southern New England, which will get the brunt of the storm, could see anywhere from 18 to 24 inches between Friday and Saturday. Suffolk County in New York is under blizzard watch, as are parts of Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island, reports The Associated Press. New York City is expecting slightly less snow — somewhere between 4 and 6 inches. The storm could be as bad as the historic blizzard of 1978, which dumped more than 2 feet of snow and blew through New England with hurricane-level winds. A few analysts say Nemo could be one of the 10 most powerful storms in the history of the region.

What kind of damage are forecasters anticipating?
The area could see “widespread power outages with winds of this force,” says Weather.com. Highways will likely be paralyzed by rush hour come Friday evening (so plan your commute accordingly). And communities in Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Long Island could see some coastal flooding as well. In the below report, The Weather Channel gives Nemo a 10 out of 10 on its winter storm index:

So flying is out of the question then?
Most likely, yes. Delta, Jet Blue, US Airways, and American Airlines are already planning ahead, offering customers a chance to change their flights one time without additional fees.

Why is this storm so nasty?
Nemo is actually the convergence of two pressure systems: One traveling east across the Great Lakes, and another coming up from the south. On Thursday night, half the storm will move through Lower Michigan and continue into upstate New York. By Friday night, prepare for the worst: Heavy snow, rain, and strong winds will start blanketing New England, upstate New York, and the Lower Hudson Valley. These conditions will persist into Saturday.

Why is it called Nemo?
The Winter Storm Team dubbed the storm “Nemo” because of its potential impact. In Greek, Nemo is a boy’s name meaning “from the valley.” In Latin, however, the name means “nobody.” “The fact is, a storm with a name is easier to follow, which will mean fewer surprises and more preparation,” said Bryan Norcross of the Weather Channel.

 

Disaster Funding, Cantor-Style

Representative Eric Cantor of Virginia

Image via Wikipedia

Dave Weigel – Slate

Mineral, Virginia, where yesterday’s earthquake originated, just so happens to be in Eric Cantor’s district. Eric Cantor just so happens to get gotcha’d every time a disaster happens and the media starts looking for budget cuts that look short-sighted from the view inside the rubble. He’s figured out how to handle this:

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor assured his constituents on Wednesday that Congress “will find the monies” to assist earthquake victims in Mineral, Virginia – but the Republican lawmaker noted that “those monies will be offset with appropriate savings or cost-cutting elsewhere.”

One factor that’s been misunderstood in today’s weird Krugman discussion is whether or not Keynesians think natural disaster = growth. Not necessarily — they tee up the conditions under which government and industry will spend new money. They may even create an environment for temporarily deregulation. You want as much relief as possible, followed by as much commerce as possible.

Cantor’s promising… well, for now, disaster relief that will be funded by cuts somewhere else. This is exactly what Faux Krugman was afraid of.

Related articles

Freak heat burst hikes Wichita temperature by nearly 20 degrees in 20 minutes _ after midnight

Oh, but “global warming is a hoax” according to most right-wingers. 

If nothing else, this report should at least give them food for thought on the issue…

The Washington Post - National

 Published: June 10

An unusual weather pattern caused temperatures in Wichita, Kan. to soar nearly 20 degrees in 20 minutes even though the sun had long gone down.National Weather Service meteorologist Stephanie Dunten says the heat burst hiked temperatures from 85 to 102 degrees in 20 minutes, beginning at 12:22 a.m. Thursday.

She says a pocket of air in the upper atmosphere collapsed, and when it hit the ground it sent winds of more than 50 mph through parts of the city.

The Wichita Eagle says that during a heat burst, rain falling from higher elevations cools air beneath it as it evaporates. The cooler air then descends quickly to the surface. As it falls, it is compressed and warms dramatically.

Copyright 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Southern Storm Emergency Declarations: Flights Canceled, Roads Icy

Huffington Post

A blast of winter weather rolled across the South on Sunday, coating bridges and roads with snow, sleet and freezing rain and causing thousands of flight cancelations.

The governors of Louisiana, Alabama, Georgia and Tennesseee declared emergencies for their states. By late Sunday, snow and ice had covered the ground in Atlanta and Birmingham, Ala., with 2 to 3 inches reported west and northwest of Atlanta.

“We don’t have weather events like this,” Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed said in an on-air interview with CNN. “I think the amount of snow we’re getting is probably a 10-year event for the city of Atlanta.”

Georgia was expecting up to 6 inches of snow in the northern mountains from the powerful storm that also dumped snow and ice in Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Texas. Forecasters said the front could also bring sleet and freezing rain lasting into Tuesday in Georgia.

Alabama Gov. Bob Riley said workers had readied snow and salt trucks to help clear icy roads, and he asked all residents to stay home Sunday night and Monday unless it is imperative that they have to travel.   More…

A Snowy Tale of My Lost Cat, Prissy…

It’s about 12:45 am here in Atlanta, GA.   Approximately three hours ago, it started snowing and within those three hours, we’ve already accumulated about 3 inches of snow.  It’s still snowing heavily as I type.

My cat was missing for a while.  My grandson let her out at about 9:30 pm.   By 10:30 pm when we checked to make sure the cats were inside, “Prissy” our grey Tabby was no where to be found.

I don’t know if cats rely on scents and their markers during regular weather, but the family figured she had lost her scent and couldn’t find her way home in the snow.  I told my daughter-in-law to start her car (with her remote car starter) and see if the sound would lure her back home.  After the car started I opened the garage door and called her.  No Prissy. 

Just as I had begun to close the garage door and as panic set in that she may be lost in the blizzard, Prissy came scamping in right before the garage door shut completely.  Prissy was home!

Metrodome Roof Collapses Under 17 Inches of Snow [VIDEO]

Huffington Post

The inflatable roof of the Minnesota Vikings’ stadium collapsed Sunday and roads were closed throughout the upper Midwest as a storm that dumped nearly 2 feet of snow in some areas crawled across the region.

A blizzard warning was in effect for parts of eastern Iowa, southeastern Wisconsin, northwestern Illinois, and northern Michigan, according to the National Weather Service. Surrounding areas including Chicago were under winter storm warnings.

The Metrodome’s Teflon roof collapsed after Minneapolis got more than 17 inches of snow. No injuries were reported. The snowfall that ended Saturday night was one of the five biggest in Twin Cities history, National Weather Service meteorologist James McQuirter said. Some surrounding communities got more than 21 inches of snow, he said.

Fox News has dramatic video from inside the Metrodome of the roof collapsing.

Atlanta storm: Major damage reported in Gwinnett County

I live in Gwinnett County.  We’ve had some pretty severe weather since early this morning.  Apparently my small section of Gwinnett County “dodged the bullet” in terms of damage from this severe weather.  

Following is a report from the Atlanta Journal Constitution

4:35 p.m.: AJC photographer Phil Skinner reports one house destroyed.

4:20 p.m.: A tornado warning has been issued for southeastern Henry County and western Newton County.

4:15 p.m.: National Weather Service: “What we know right now is that damage has been reported.”

4:10 p.m.: The damaged homes are in the Buford area, according to Capt. Tommy Rutledge with the Gwinnett County fire department. No injuries have been reported.

4 p.m.: Gwinnett County fire and police officials are reporting several homes have been damaged due to storms.

The rain is making its way out of the metro Atlanta area, and much cooler temperatures are on the way.

In the meantime, expect standing water on area interstates and streets.

The National Weather Service Issued a tornado watch Tuesday morning for most of metro Atlanta, and at 3 p.m. a watch was issued for counties in the east and southeast metro area. The watch means conditions are favorable for tornadoes to develop.

Heavy rain moved into the metro area early Tuesday afternoon, with a heavy downpour reported through Cobb and Paulding counties around 1:30. A line of heavy thunderstorms stretched hundreds of miles, from the Georgia-Tennessee border to the Gulf of Mexico in west Florida.

By 3 p.m., the line of storms was moving northeast and south of the metro area, Channel 2 Action News meteorologist David Chandley said.

“Our threat is greatly diminished for the afternoon commute,” Chandley said.

The biggest threat to the evening commute is likely to be pooled water on interstates and side streets. Shortly before 4 p.m., GDOT reported several lane closures due to water.   Continue reading here…