Herman Cain

E.W. Jackson Has Been an Unmitigated Disaster for the Virginia GOP

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Virginia Lieutenant Governor Candidate E.W. Jackson gestures as he speaks during the Faith and Freedom Coalition Road to Majority 2013 conference, Saturday, June 15, 2013, in Washington. (Carolyn Kaster/AP)

Good.  Jackson is this year’s Herman Caine and Alan West…

The Daily Beast

Ken Cuccinelli’s gubernatorial implosion may be distracting pundits, but E.W. Jackson’s risible candidacy for lieutenant governor is an even bigger embarrassment for the state party.

Right now, all the attention in the Virginia gubernatorial race is focused on Ken Cuccinelli’s losing campaign and Mark Obenshain’s competitive race for attorney general. The other statewide race, between state Sen. Ralph Northam and Bishop E.W. Jackson for lieutenant governor, has gone off the radar, and for good reason. There’s no question that the far-right candidate will lose in a landslide. Jackson’s not a candidate as much as he is a sideshow, an example of the base-driven politics that has crippled Virginia’s Republican Party in the general election.

To wit, here’s a short round-up of Jackson’s statements and positions in just the last week of the campaign. On guns, Jackson says, “Every person who has a concealed weapons permit and was trained to use a firearm…should be allowed to bring that firearm to school.” On rights for gay and lesbian Americans, he says, “How in the world can we expect our military to be blessed by the hand of almighty God if we allow our military to become the equivalent of Sodom and Gomorrah? God is not pleased.” On the right-wing grassroots, he says, “It was God’s plan to beget the Tea Party.” And on the question of education, he says Obama will “force schools to start teaching all children homosexuality.”Cuccinelli has worked hard to avoid any association with Jackson; of all the events the attorney general held over the weekend, none featured the conservative clergyman and anti-gay activist. The irony, of course, is that Jackson’s candidacy is the direct result of Cuccinelli’s decision to push for a convention as opposed to a primary. Given his strong support among rank-and-file Republicans, odds are good that Cuccinelli would have won a primary for the Republican gubernatorial nomination. And he would have walked away from the contest with a sensible nominee; Jackson, as his sparsely attended events and low fundraising attest, is a niche product for a handful of voters. In a fair election against a capable opponent, he would have fallen far short of victory. As it stands, Jackson is now one of the faces of the Virginia GOP, and his presence on the ticket has been an unmitigated disaster.

Like Cain or West, Jackson’s career—and income—is earned with outrageous statements about government, Obama, and other African-Americans.

After Jackson won the nomination, he wrote a bit about his place in the universe of “black conservatives,” a category distinct from African-Americans who hold conservative views. Like Georgia businessman Herman Cain or former Florida congressman Allen West, Jackson’s career—and income—is earned with outrageous statements about government, President Obama, and other African-Americans. Here’s Jackson explaining how programs like Medicare and Medicaid are to blame for the deterioration of black families: “[T]he programs that began in the ’60s, the programs that began to tell women that ‘you don’t need a man in the home, the government will take care of you,’ and began to tell men, ‘you don’t need to be in the home, the government will take care of this woman and take care of these children.’ That’s when the black family began to deteriorate.” Such beliefs are similar to West’s insistence, for instance, that African-Americans are chained to the “Democratic plantation.”

An honest look at these figures will tell you that they’re grifters. They can’t succeed in politics, but—for a fee—they can tell you want you to hear about the world. And who are the voters who want to give their money and attention to charlatans like Jackson and West? Right-wing conservatives who desperately want validation that they aren’t racist and that their views are acceptable to African-Americans as is.

That isn’t true. But as long as there’s money is in it, there will be some Professional Black Conservative who shows up to tell the Tea Party exactly what it wants to hear.

H/t: DB

Fugelsang defends Al Jazeera America against ‘right wing insanely fake Christian hate-monkey trolls’

John Fugelsang defends Al Jazeera America [Current TV]

The Raw Story

Even though he will not be part of Current TV’s transition into Al Jazeera America, Viewpoint host John Fugelsang still insisted on defending the nascent network against the right-wing trolling that has followed its impending launch.

“Even though I work for Current, I was getting called a terrorist on Twitter every day by the jackal pack man-children of Michelle Malkin’s Twitchy site,” Fugelsang said he told network executives. “I even met Herman Cain a few months ago — he tried to explain that by being a U.S. ally, Qatar is just trying to lull us into a false state of security so they could do something.”

In the end, Fugelsang argued, the Islamophobia behind the “right wing insanely fake Christian hate-monkey trolls” is not going to matter.

“They’re gonna launch, the channel will evolve and grow, and the people who really believe Obama’s really a Muslim will also believe coddling the wealthy, cutting programs for the poor, invading countries that never attacked us and hating those who are different are Christian,” he said.

He also revisited his past criticism of the hate directed toward the company’s home-base of Qatar, a U.S. military ally visited by then-President George W. Bush in 2003. And while he acknowledged that the network’s Middle Eastern broadcasts contain elements of homophobia and anti-Semitism, the same could be said of Fox News.

“I know you guys are easily confused; most of you think “Rwanda” was J.J’s sister on Good Times,” Fugelsang said to conservatives. “But Al Jazeera America represents something more than news that isn’t profit or ratings driven — they represent foreign investment in a country where the two-party system outsourced your jobs. They represent facts over opinion and they represent our cultures coming together just a little more, whether you bigots like it or not.”

Watch Fugelsang stick up for Al Jazeera America, aired Monday on Current.

 

The David Pakman Show – Herman Cain: Obama Voters Have ‘Severe Ignorance Problem’ (VIDEO)

Pakman_Cain

This is obviously a case of projection on Mr. Cain’s part…

Addicting Info

From the David Pakman Show

Herman Cain is a new voice on Fox News. His comments seem to make him a worthy replacement for Sarah Palin, matching the obtuseness she often offered.

For example, when asked in an interview with Bill O’Reilly why President Obama is so popular, he responded along the lines of (as David paraphrases):

“We have a severe ignorance problem and he received the vote of 51% of the electorate who were misled enough to vote for him.”

Of course, as David points out, all of the facts contradict this assertion, but why argue with truth?

David shares segments of the O’Reilly/Cain interview and discusses the disconnect that continues in the way Fox, and the right in general, view the true mood of America.

See the video:

Week in one liners: Biden, Cain, Carney

Politico

The top quotes in politics …

“I’m looking for pies.” —Vice President Joe Biden at Costco.

“He said he wouldn’t play me but I could play on his team.” — Redskins quarterback Robert Griffin III on challenging Obama to a basketball game.

“Last week The Onion said I was going to become a male stripper.”  — Education Secretary Arne Duncan responding to questions about his future.

“It’s a cultural icon! Or something.” — Former White House hopeful Herman Cain on his 9-9-9 tax plan.

“I screwed up royally.”— Ex-CIA director David Petraeus in a letter about his affair.

“The only good thing about Grover Norquist is he’s named after a character from ‘Sesame Street.'”  — Former Pres. George W. Bush adviser Matthew Dowd going after the anti-tax activist.

“The notion that you can solve all problems over a cocktail I think is a little overrated.” — WH press secretary Jay Carney on the importance of socialization with lawmakers.

“I got beer!” — Small business owner Deborah Carey discovering bottles of White House home brew in her swag bag.

 

Politico’s Week in one liners: Ryan, Obama, Romney

 

Paul Ryan, Barack Obama and Ann Romney are pictured. | AP Photos

Politico

The top quotes in politics …

“Good evening everyone, and welcome to Barack Obama’s retirement party!” — Former Gov.Tim Pawlenty knocking the president at the RNC.

“It should be a pretty entertaining show.” — President Barack Obama commenting on the convention.

“Save a little for Mitt.” Actor Clint Eastwood hushing an excited crowd at the RNC.

“He’s a unique guy, and he did a unique thing last night.” — Ann Romney when asked about Eastwood’speech.

“My playlist starts with AC/DC and ends with Zeppelin.” — Rep. Paul Ryan on Romney’s poor taste in music.

“Ryan is the devil in disguise.” — “View” co-host Joy Behar ripping the GOP vice presidential candidate.

“If everyone had competed fairly and honestly, I’d probably be the nominee.” — Herman Cainlamenting his failed White House bid.

“Put me down as undecided.” Rep. Ron Paul discussing his vote in November.

 

Politico’s: Week in one liners: Cain, FLOTUS

AP Photos

Politico

The top quotes in politics …

“Of course it’s easier if you hold an Olympic Games in the middle of nowhere.” — British Prime Minister David Cameron tweaking Mitt Romnney.

“I love the fact that the guy is rich.” — Former White House hopeful Herman Cain defending  Romney.

“I wish my kids would become wealthy.”  Vice President Joe Biden on making money.

“They were asking me to do the Dougie, there just wasn’t the beat.” — First lady Michelle Obama on getting asked to dance.

“My, my, my how carefully they read that bill.” — House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer ridiculing  Republicans for a typo.

“The inspiration for that is definitely Elle Woods.” — New York state Senate candidate Mindy Meyer linking her pink campaign site to “Legally Blonde.”

“They’re not watching ‘Real Housewives.’ I’m just saying.'” — President Barack Obama telling  young Americans about their global competition.

The week in one-liners: Biden, Bush, Cain

Politico

The top quotes in politics …

“I will transmit this information to Vladimir.” — Russian President Dmitry Medvedev offering to pass President Obama’s message along.

“It’s bulls—.” — Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum getting annoyed with a New York Times reporter.

“Don’t retreat.” — Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin encouraging Santorum.

“Aren’t you going to sing a song for us? Know when to fold ‘em?” — Former first lady Barbara Bush egging on her husband.

“The rabbit that we shot was a toy, stuffed rabbit.” — Former White House hopeful Herman Cain defending this ad.

“Mitt Romney has changed positions more often than a pornographic movie queen.” — Former Sen. Arlen Specter dissing Romney.

“Thank you, Dr. Pepper.” — Vice President Joe Biden flubbing a name in a speech.

The Day In 100 Seconds: CPAC Day One

TPM2012

Well, we’re one third of the way through the annual right wing confab known as the Conservative Political Action Conference and what a journey already.

The big guns are still to come, but the warm up acts today included Senators, Congressmen, former Presidential Candidates, actors, talking heads and one self-described comedian.

We heard a litany of reasons why conservatives are just plain awesome and possibly more reasons why the President has to go. So, sit back, catch up on the highlights and get ready because the best is yet to come…

Rachel Maddow Blog: Clint Eastwood wins the Super Bowl

The Rachel Maddow Blog  says that Clint Eastwood won the Super Bowl!  The way people are talking about it (she has more than 90 comments on this title alone) she may be right.

It’s interesting that Clint Eastwood, a Republican who supported John McCain in 2008 and most recently, Herman Cain touts the regrowth of Detroit and the auto industry’s comeback.  I was under the impression that one of the biggest faux pas ever committed by a Republican is to tout any Obama successes.

Granted, Eastwood never mentions Obama in the commercial because it is really a centric commercial, however, most folks know that the GOP was adamantly against a bail out for the auto industry from the time The President proposed it.  So it only stands to reason that some GOPers will not be too happy with Eastwood’s Chrysler commercial.

In the following  Reganesque titled Super Bowl commercial: It’s Half-time in America,  Eastwood and Chrysler appear to have a hit Super Bowl commercial on their hands…

 

 

Politico’s: The week in one-liners: Mitt, Jay, Donald

The top quotes in politics …

“I’m not concerned about the very poor.”— Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney making a regrettable remark.

“Mitt is tough, he’s smart, he’s sharp.” — Donald Trump endorsing Romney for president.

“I’m not going to comb-over that question.” — White House Press Secretary Jay Carney when asked about Trump.

“I like hiring people.” —  GOP White House hopeful Newt Gingrich dismissing The Donald’s endorsement.

“I still endorse the people and Newt Gingrich. They are not exclusive of each other.” — Former Godfather’s Pizza CEO Herman Cain clarifying his stance.

“He does have a beautiful voice, and he sings to me all the time.” — First lady Michelle Obama complimenting her husband.

“Don’t muck it up!” — President Barack Obama telling lawmakers to keep the economy moving forward.