Fox News

Jon Stewart Brilliantly Shreds Fox News Over Its Benghazi ‘Rage-gasm’

The Huffington Post

When Jon Stewart retires from “The Daily Show” later this year, Fox News might be the first in line to throw him a party because being on the wrong end of his wrath night after night can’t be that much fun.

On Thursday, Stewart tore the “fair and balanced” news network to shreds over its repeated demands that Ferguson protesters and their supporters apologize in the wake of a Department of Justice report that found Michael Brown didn’t have his hands up when he was shot by Officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, Missouri.

“The lesson Fox News is getting at is very clear,” said Stewart. “Wouldn’t it be nice if people who jumped to conclusions and peddled a false, divisive, anger-stoking narrative had to apologize for misleading America?”

So how about Fox News and its “two-year rage-gasm” over Benghazi? As Stewart points out, a report from a Republican-led committee that cleared the Obama administration of just about every conspiracy theory Fox News has been pushing went largely ignored by the network.

Has Fox News apologized for its “tsunami of misinformation?”

Of course not — and, for now anyway, Stewart is still here to remind them of it.

Check out the clip above for the full take-down.

Fox News stands by Bill O’Reilly

Bill O'Reilly is pictured. | Getty

Bill O’Reilly is pictured. | Getty

Politico

If Fox News host Bill O’Reilly has a “Brian Williams problem,” as his detractors hope, it may be one with a different outcome.

In a statement Sunday, a spokesperson for the cable channel said, “Fox News Chairman and C.E.O. Roger Ailes and all senior management are in full support of Bill O’Reilly,” according to The New York Times.

O’Reilly is contesting accusations that he has repeatedly exaggerated his war-reporting experience.

An article by Mother Jones last week claimed that O’Reilly has misled audiences with multiple accounts about his experience reporting for CBS News during the 1982 Falklands War between the United Kingdom and Argentina, and in El Salvador.

O’Reilly never set foot in a war zone like the one he described, the article by Mother Jones asserts, featuring quotes from his CBS contemporaries.

“Nobody got to the war zone during the Falklands war,” CBS News producer Susan Zirinsky told the magazine, adding that the military junta in Argentina prevented American reporters from getting to the islands.

“I never said I was on the Falkland Islands,” O’Reilly said on “The O’Reilly Factor” last Friday. “I said I covered the Falklands, which is what I did.”

“This is such a smear, it is unbelievable,” O’Reilly told Fox News’ Howard Kurtz on his “MediaBuzz” program Sunday.

But since Mother Jones published its article, others have come forward to criticize O’Reilly’s version of events.

Another former colleague pushed back on O’Reilly’s accounts late last week in a lengthy Facebook post.

Eric Engberg, a former CBS News correspondent who covered the aftermath of the Falklands conflict from Buenos Aires, said that O’Reilly’s story about covering a protest in the Argentine capital wasn’t accurate, adding that it was a “relatively tame riot” after Argentina surrendered to the British on the islands.

“It was an ‘expense account zone,’” Engberg wrote.

O’Reilly responded to the post on Sunday, reading from a contemporary New York Times dispatch that recounted police using tear gas to disperse “thousands of angry Argentines who had massed in front of the presidential palace.” Engberg said that the Fox News host’s story about his cameraman getting run down and “bleeding from the ear” could have only happened during that event.

“I don’t think he was there. I don’t think he knows what happened,” O’Reilly said of Engberg, adding that he had requested the video of the protest from CBS News.

CBS News confirmed to Deadline that it is in the process of locating video of the incident O’Reilly is referencing.

Bill O’Reilly Has His Own Brian Williams Problem

Mother Jones

The Fox News host has said he was in a “war zone” that apparently no American correspondent reached.

After NBC News suspended anchor Brian Williams for erroneously claiming that he was nearly shot down in a helicopter while covering the US invasion of Iraq in 2003, Fox News host Bill O’Reilly went on a tear. On his television show, the top-rated cable news anchor declared that the American press isn’t “half as responsible as the men who forged the nation.” He bemoaned the supposed culture of deception within the liberal media, and he proclaimed that the Williams controversy should prompt questioning of other “distortions” by left-leaning outlets. Yet for years, O’Reilly has recounted dramatic stories about his own war reporting that don’t withstand scrutiny—even claiming he acted heroically in a war zone that he apparently never set foot in.

O’Reilly has repeatedly told his audience that he was a war correspondent during the Falklands war and that he experienced combat during that 1982 conflict between England and Argentina. He has often invoked this experience to emphasize that he understands war as only someone who has witnessed it could. As he once put it, “I’ve been there. That’s really what separates me from most of these other bloviators. I bloviate, but I bloviate about stuff I’ve seen. They bloviate about stuff that they haven’t.”

Fox News and O’Reilly did not respond to multiple requests for comment.

Here are instances when O’Reilly touted his time as a war correspondent during the Falklands conflict:

  • In his 2001 book, The No Spin Zone: Confrontations With the Powerful and Famous in America, O’Reilly stated, “You know that I am not easily shocked. I’ve reported on the ground in active war zones from El Salvador to the Falklands.”
  • Conservative journalist Tucker Carlson, in a 2003 book, described how O’Reilly answered a question during a Washington panel discussion about media coverage of the Afghanistan war: “Rather than simply answer the question, O’Reilly began by trying to establish his own bona fides as a war correspondent. ‘I’ve covered wars, okay? I’ve been there. The Falklands, Northern Ireland, the Middle East. I’ve almost been killed three times, okay.'”
  • In a 2004 column about US soldiers fighting in Iraq, O’Reilly noted, “Having survived a combat situation in Argentina during the Falklands war, I know that life-and-death decisions are made in a flash.”
  • In 2008, he took a shot at journalist Bill Moyers, saying, “I missed Moyers in the war zones of [the] Falkland conflict in Argentina, the Middle East, and Northern Ireland. I looked for Bill, but I didn’t see him.”

Much more continued here…

Sun News Network, Canada’s “Fox News North,” Has Been Canceled

Sun News: Ezra Levant, Ann Coulter

Unfortunately, Fox News in the States don’t suffer from a lack of  viewers so the comparison is minuscule at best. However, the absurdity of both networks’ programming and guests are quite similar.

MediaMatters

Sun News Network, the right-wing Canadian news network described as “Fox News North,” is shutting down.

The Globe and Mail reports that Sun News went off-air at 5 a.m. on Friday morning when “the screen went dark and was replaced moments later with the Sun TV logo.”

In a press release, Julie Tremblay, president and CEO of Sun News parent Media Group and Sun Media Corporation said, “Over the past four years, we tried everything we could to achieve sufficient market penetration to generate the profits needed to operate a national news channel. Sadly, the numerous obstacles to carriage that we encountered spelled the end of this venture.”

When Sun News launched in 2011, its executives attacked what they described as the “smug, condescending, irrelevant” journalism of existing Canadian outlets like the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC).

But soon after, Sun News failed to attract a significant audience, drawing in about 0.1 percent of Canadian viewers between August 31, 2011 and March 31, 2012.

The network went on to attract controversy. It had to apologize on behalf of host Ezra Levant, who called the late Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau a “slut,” and it gave a show to Toronto Mayor Rob Ford after he was caught on video smoking crack cocaine.

Despite those headline-grabbing incidents, ratings never came and the network continued to operate in the red.

Fox host: FEMA is unnecessary because Walmart will ‘spontaneously’ save us all in a disaster

Fox Business host John Stossel (screen grab)

When I think about how John Stossel was NYC’s go to guy for consumer advocacy in the 80’s.  I can’t believe how far he has sunk into the Fox News “rabbit hole”.

The Raw Story

Fox Business host John Stossel on Sunday asserted that most government was unnecessary because companies like Walmart would spontaneously provide assistance to disaster victims “in many more ways” than the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) could.

“Ever feel like government makes too many plans that come to naught?” Fox News host Tucker Carlson told Stossel during a segment on Fox & Friends. “It’s kind of a bold idea. You’re saying that not every human activity needs to be planned from above. Some things spontaneously work themselves out pretty well.”

According to Stossel, Americans would be better off with less government and more “spontaneous order,” a term coined by economist Friedrich Hayek which states that order will naturally emerge from chaos.

“If you hadn’t seen a skating rink, you would say, ‘No, you need skating police, people go in this direction,’” Stossel observed. “Think of how much of life is spontaneous… Jazz, there’s no direction. So much of life is spontaneous, but our instinct is to say, ‘Government, give us a plan.’”

The Fox Business host said that one example of government over-planning was natural disasters.

“After Katrina, Walmart and private charities helped people in many more ways than FEMA did,” Stossel opined. “Because FEMA is incompetent because government tends to be. But also Walmart everyday needs to know what people need, and they were ready. They had more weather forecasters than some of the local governments do.”

“You’re challenging the very idea of Washington, D.C.,” Carlson pointed out. “Good for you.”

“Well, we need some government,” Stossel admitted. “But not much.”

The Week’s Damon Linker argued last year that “spontaneous order” was the “silliest and most harmful of all” libertarian ideas.

Linker said that the United States had conducted two experiments in “spontaneous order” in recent years by overthrowing governments in Iraq and Libya.

“In both cases, spontaneity brought the opposite of order. It produced anarchy and civil war, mass death and human suffering,” he wrote. “Order doesn’t just happen, and it isn’t the product of individual freedom.”

“The libertarian prophets of ‘spontaneous order’ get things exactly backward, sometimes with catastrophic real-world consequences. Which is why it’s a particularly bad idea,” Linker concluded.

As for Walmart, the company was praised for its response to Hurricane Katrina, but experts pointed out that FEMA had many more responsibilities.

“FEMA has to prioritize search and rescue, and moving equipment, moving people, moving medical supplies,” ABC News homeland security expert observed in 2005. “Wal-Mart just has to deliver supplies.”

Watch the video below from Fox News’ Fox & Friends, broadcast Feb. 8, 2015.

Megyn Kelly Speaks Up For Mandatory Vaccination On Fox: ‘Some Things Do Require Big Brother’

kelly

Credit: AP

It looks like Fox News can tell the truth at times…

Think Progress

A debate on vaccines has infected the nascent 2016 Republican presidential primary. Rand Paul, for example, said that the right of parents to refuse vaccines is “an issue of freedom.” To bolster his point, he claimed that vaccines can give children “profound mental disorders,” and idea that is completely unsupported by medical literature.

Similarly, Chris Christie framed the vaccination issue as a matter of “parental choice.” (Faced with mounting criticism, Christie later backtracked partially, saying only some vaccines should be optional.)

Monday night on Fox News, Megyn Kelly provided the antidote. Appearing on The O’Reilly Factor, Kelly spoke out forcefully for mandatory vaccines. (O’Reilly agreed.) Speaking directly into the camera, Kelly said, “I want to say on the record, I have three children under the age of six. I vaccinated all of them. On time. As the doctor prescribed. Nothing was delayed.” She noted that the science showing vaccinations are safe and beneficial for children is “very certain today.”

Kelly predicted the issue would continue to play a role in the Republican presidential primary because it had become about “Big Brother.” “On the other hand, some things do require some involvement of Big Brother,” Kelly said.

Kelly may want to have a conversation with her colleague, Sean Hannity. On his program Monday, Hannity said that “parents should have the choice” on whether to vaccinate their children. Hannity featured commentary from Dr. Eric Braverman who told millions of views that “no one” is giving their children the full course of vaccine shots. According to Braverman there is an “overreliance” on vaccines to prevent disease.

The segment featured more medically accurate commentary from Dr. Marc Siegel, who accused Braverman of perpetrating a “bait and switch.” Even Siegel, however, opposed mandatory vaccinations. Braverman concluded the segment by claiming that vaccines “don’t always work” and attributing the measles outbreak in Disneyland to the combination of heat and junk food.

In 2015, there have been more than 100 cases of measles reported in the U.S. across 14 states. The Center For Disease Control is “very concerned” that the country could be on its way to a major measles outbreak. Already, dozens of babies, too young to get vaccinated, have been forced into isolation.

Although Megyn Kelly has a growing reputation of standing up to some of the worst excesses on Fox News, not everyone is impressed.

America’s 10 worst terror attacks by Christian fundamentalists and far-right extremists

Allen Graham - PDImages / Shutterstock.com

The Raw Story

From Fox News to the Weekly Standard, neoconservatives have tried to paint terrorism as a largely or exclusively Islamic phenomenon. Their message of Islamophobia has been repeated many times since the George W. Bush era: Islam is inherently violent, Christianity is inherently peaceful, and there is no such thing as a Christian terrorist or a white male terrorist. But the facts don’t bear that out. Far-right white male radicals and extreme Christianists are every bit as capable of acts of terrorism as radical Islamists, and to pretend that such terrorists don’t exist does the public a huge disservice. Dzhokhar Anzorovich Tsarnaev and the late Tamerlan Anzorovich Tsarnaev (the Chechen brothers suspected in the Boston Marathon bombing of April 15, 2013) are both considered white and appear to have been motivated in part by radical Islam. And many terrorist attacks in the United States have been carried out by people who were neither Muslims nor dark-skinned.

When white males of the far right carry out violent attacks, neocons and Republicans typically describe them as lone-wolf extremists rather than people who are part of terrorist networks or well-organized terrorist movements. Yet many of the terrorist attacks in the United States have been carried out by people who had long histories of networking with other terrorists. In fact, most of the terrorist activity occurring in the United States in recent years has not come from Muslims, but from a combination of radical Christianists, white supremacists and far-right militia groups.

Below are 10 of the worst examples of non-Islamic terrorism that have occurred in the United States in the last 30 years.

1. Wisconsin Sikh Temple massacre, Aug. 5, 2012. The virulent, neocon-fueled Islamophobia that has plagued post-9/11 America has not only posed a threat to Muslims, it has had deadly consequences for people of other faiths, including Sikhs. Sikhs are not Muslims; the traditional Sikh attire, including their turbans, is different from traditional Sunni, Shiite or Sufi attire. But to a racist, a bearded Sikh looks like a Muslim. Only four days after 9/11, Balbir Singh Sodhi, a Sikh immigrant from India who owned a gas station in Mesa, Arizona, was murdered by Frank Silva Roque, a racist who obviously mistook him for a Muslim.

But Sodhi’s murder was not the last example of anti-Sikh violence in post-9/11 America. On Aug. 5, 2012, white supremacist Wade Michael Page used a semiautomatic weapon to murder six people during an attack on a Sikh temple in Oak Creek, Wisconsin. Page’s connection to the white supremacist movement was well-documented: he had been a member of the neo-Nazi rock bands End Empathy and Definite Hate. Attorney General Eric Holder described the attack as “an act of terrorism, an act of hatred.” It was good to see the nation’s top cop acknowledge that terrorist acts can, in fact, involve white males murdering people of color.

2. The murder of Dr. George Tiller, May 31, 2009. Imagine that a physician had been the victim of an attempted assassination by an Islamic jihadist in 1993, and received numerous death threats from al-Qaeda after that, before being murdered by an al-Qaeda member. Neocons, Fox News and the Christian Right would have had a field day. A physician was the victim of a terrorist killing that day, but neither the terrorist nor the people who inflamed the terrorist were Muslims. Dr. George Tiller, who was shot and killed by anti-abortion terrorist Scott Roeder on May 31, 2009, was a victim of Christian Right terrorism, not al-Qaeda.

Tiller had a long history of being targeted for violence by Christian Right terrorists. In 1986, his clinic was firebombed. Then, in 1993, Tiller was shot five times by female Christian Right terrorist Shelly Shannon (now serving time in a federal prison) but survived that attack. Given that Tiller had been the victim of an attempted murder and received countless death threats after that, Fox News would have done well to avoid fanning the flames of unrest. Instead, Bill O’Reilly repeatedly referred to him as “Tiller the baby killer.” When Roeder murdered Tiller, O’Reilly condemned the attack but did so in a way that was lukewarm at best.

Keith Olbermann called O’Reilly out and denounced him as a “facilitator for domestic terrorism” and a “blindly irresponsible man.” And Crazy for God author Frank Schaffer, who was formerly a figure on the Christian Right but has since become critical of that movement, asserted that the Christian Right’s extreme anti-abortion rhetoric “helped create the climate that made this murder likely to happen.” Neocon Ann Coulter, meanwhile, viewed Tiller’s murder as a source of comic relief, telling O’Reilly, “I don’t really like to think of it as a murder. It was terminating Tiller in the 203rd trimester.” The Republican/neocon double standard when it comes to terrorism is obvious. At Fox News and AM neocon talk radio, Islamic terrorism is a source of nonstop fear-mongering, while Christian Right terrorism gets a pass.

3. Knoxville Unitarian Universalist Church shooting, July 27, 2008. On July 27, 2008, Christian Right sympathizer Jim David Adkisson walked into the Knoxville Unitarian Universalist Church in Knoxville, Tennessee during a children’s play and began shooting people at random. Two were killed, while seven others were injured but survived. Adkisson said he was motivated by a hatred of liberals, Democrats and gays, and he considered neocon Bernard Goldberg’s book, 100 People Who Are Screwing Up America, his political manifesto. Adkisson (who pleaded guilty to two counts of first-degree murder and is now serving life in prison without parole) was vehemently anti-abortion, but apparently committing an act of terrorism during a children’s play was good ol’ Republican family values. While Adkisson’s act of terrorism was reported on Fox News, it didn’t get the round-the-clock coverage an act of Islamic terrorism would have garnered.

4. The murder of Dr. John Britton, July 29, 1994. To hear the Christian Right tell it, there is no such thing as Christian terrorism. Tell that to the victims of the Army of God, a loose network of radical Christianists with a long history of terrorist attacks on abortion providers. One Christian Right terrorist with ties to the Army of God was Paul Jennings Hill, who was executed by lethal injection on Sept. 3, 2003 for the murders of abortion doctor John Britton and his bodyguard James Barrett. Hill shot both of them in cold blood and expressed no remorse whatsoever; he insisted he was doing’s God’s work and has been exalted as a martyr by the Army of God.

5. The Centennial Olympic Park bombing, July 27, 1996. Paul Jennings Hill is hardly the only Christian terrorist who has been praised by the Army of God; that organization has also praised Eric Rudolph, who is serving life without parole for a long list of terrorist attacks committed in the name of Christianity. Rudolph is best known for carrying out the Olympic Park bombing in Atlanta during the 1996 Summer Olympics—a blast that killed spectator Alice Hawthorne and wounded 111 others. Hawthorne wasn’t the only person Rudolph murdered: his bombing of an abortion clinic in Birmingham, Alabama in 1998 caused the death of Robert Sanderson (a Birmingham police officer and part-time security guard) and caused nurse Emily Lyons to lose an eye.

Rudolph’s other acts of Christian terrorism include bombing the Otherwise Lounge (a lesbian bar in Atlanta) in 1997 and an abortion clinic in an Atlanta suburb in 1997. Rudolph was no lone wolf: he was part of a terrorist movement that encouraged his violence. And the Army of God continues to exalt Rudolph as a brave Christian who is doing God’s work.

6. The murder of Barnett Slepian by James Charles Kopp, Oct. 23, 1998. Like Paul Jennings Hill, Eric Rudolph and Scott Roeder, James Charles Kopp is a radical Christian terrorist who has been exalted as a hero by the Army of God. On Oct. 23, 1998 Kopp fired a single shot into the Amherst, NY home of Barnett Slepian (a doctor who performed abortions), mortally wounding him. Slepian died an hour later. Kopp later claimed he only meant to wound Slepian, not kill him. But Judge Michael D’Amico of Erin County, NY said that the killing was clearly premeditated and sentenced Kopp to 25 years to life. Kopp is a suspect in other anti-abortion terrorist attacks, including the non-fatal shootings of three doctors in Canada, though it appears unlikely that Kopp will be extradited to Canada to face any charges.

7. Planned Parenthood bombing, Brookline, Massachusetts, 1994. Seldom has the term “Christian terrorist” been used in connection with John C. Salvi on AM talk radio or at Fox News, but it’s a term that easily applies to him. In 1994, the radical anti-abortionist and Army of God member attacked a Planned Parenthood clinic in Brookline, Massachusetts, shooting and killing receptionists Shannon Lowney and Lee Ann Nichols and wounding several others. Salvi was found dead in his prison cell in 1996, and his death was ruled a suicide. The Army of God has exalted Salvi as a Christian martyr and described Lowney and Nichols not as victims of domestic terrorism, but as infidels who got what they deserved. The Rev. Donald Spitz, a Christianist and Army of God supporter who is so extreme that even the radical anti-abortion group Operation Rescue disassociated itself from him, has praised Salvi as well.

8. Suicide attack on IRS building in Austin, Texas, Feb. 18, 2010. When Joseph Stack flew a plane into the Echelon office complex (where an IRS office was located), Fox News’ coverage of the incident was calm and matter-of-fact. Republican Rep. Steve King of Iowa seemed to find the attack amusing and joked that it could have been avoided if the federal government had followed his advice and abolished the IRS. Nonetheless, there were two fatalities: Stack and IRS employee Vernon Hunter. Stack left behind a rambling suicide note outlining his reasons for the attack, which included a disdain for the IRS as well as total disgust with health insurance companies and bank bailouts. Some of the most insightful coverage of the incident came from Noam Chomsky, who said that while Stack had some legitimate grievances—millions of Americans shared his outrage over bank bailouts and the practices of health insurance companies—the way he expressed them was absolutely wrong.

9. The murder of Alan Berg, June 18, 1984. One of the most absurd claims some Republicans have made about white supremacists is that they are liberals and progressives. That claim is especially ludicrous in light of the terrorist killing of liberal Denver-based talk show host Alan Berg, a critic of white supremacists who was killed with an automatic weapon on June 18, 1984. The killing was linked to members of the Order, a white supremacist group that had marked Berg for death. Order members David Lane (a former Ku Klux Klan member who had also been active in the Aryan Nations) and Bruce Pierce were both convicted in federal court on charges of racketeering, conspiracy and violating Berg’s civil rights and given what amounted to life sentences.

Robert Matthews, who founded the Order, got that name from a fictional group in white supremacist William Luther Pierce’s anti-Semitic 1978 novel, The Turner Diaries—a book Timothy McVeigh was quite fond of. The novel’s fictional account of the destruction of a government building has been described as the inspiration for the Oklahoma City bombing of 1995.

10. Timothy McVeigh and the Oklahoma City bombing, April 19, 1995. Neocons and Republicans grow angry and uncomfortable whenever Timothy McVeigh is cited as an example of a non-Islamic terrorist. Pointing out that a non-Muslim white male carried out an attack as vicious and deadly as the Oklahoma City bombing doesn’t fit into their narrative that only Muslims and people of color are capable of carrying out terrorist attacks. Neocons will claim that bringing up McVeigh’s name during a discussion of terrorism is a “red herring” that distracts us from fighting radical Islamists, but that downplays the cruel, destructive nature of the attack.

Prior to the al-Qaeda attacks of 9/11, the Oklahoma City bombing McVeigh orchestrated was the most deadly terrorist attack in U.S. history: 168 people were killed and more than 600 were injured. When McVeigh drove a truck filled with explosives into the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, his goal was to kill as many people as possible. Clearly, McVeigh was not motivated by radical Islam; rather, he was motivated by an extreme hatred for the U.S. government and saw the attack as revenge for the Ruby Ridge incident of 1992 and the Waco Siege in 1993. He had white supremacist leanings as well (when he was in the U.S. Army, McVeigh was reprimanded for wearing a “white power” T-shirt he had bought at a KKK demonstration). McVeigh was executed on June 11, 2001. He should have served life without parole instead, as a living reminder of the type of viciousness the extreme right is capable of.

Fox ‘Terror Expert’ Apologizes For Saying British City Is ‘Totally Muslim’ (VIDEO)

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TPM LiveWire

“In Britain, it’s not just no-go zones, there are actual cities like Birmingham that are totally Muslim where non-Muslims just simply don’t go in,” Steven Emerson said during a Sunday appearance on “Justice with Judge Jeanine.”

“And parts of London, there are actually Muslim religious police that actually beat and actually wound seriously anyone who doesn’t dress according to Muslim, religious Muslim attire,” he continued.

In fact, Birmingham has a Muslim population of 21.8%, according to the UK’s Office for National Statistics.

Emerson, whose website calls him “one of the leading authorities on Islamic extremist networks,”issued an extensive apology after his remarks set off a wave of a ridicule on social media.

“I have clearly made a terrible error for which I am deeply sorry. My comments about Birmingham were totally in error,” he told the UK edition of the Huffington Post on Sunday.

Emerson called it an “inexcusable error” and said he would make a correction immediately for “the beautiful city of Birmingham,” according to the site.

“PS. I intend to make a donation to Birmingham Children’s Hospital,” he added.

The Fox contributor’s original comments sparked a hashtag mocking the channel’s coverage of Islam, #FoxNewsFacts.

Incidentally, the program’s host, Jeanine Pirro, had her own moment of ignorance during the show when she said Pakistan was the most important “Arab” nation in the West’s crackdown on global terrorism. (Pakistan is a South Asian country.)

“It is time for this to be over and stop sending American dollars to any Arab country that does not support this mission, Pakistan at the top of the list,” she said.

Watch the clip courtesy of HuffPo UK:

Fox News Gets Trolled Into Oblivion After Saying Birmingham, UK Is ‘Totally Muslim’ Caliphate (VIDEO)

Addicting Info

It must be a pretty terrible feeling to know that you went onto Fox News and said something so completely idiotic that the entire world took the time to make fun of you. On a network renown for its terrible opinions and inane guests and hosts, Fox’s terrorism “expert” Steven Emerson emerged as the clear front runner as the dumbest of them all.

During a segment on the terrorist attack in Paris, Fox News brought on Emerson to lecture the country on how they and other countries in Europe may have brought this attack on themselves by tolerating Muslims.

And before you think lecturing a country that has just experienced a devastating attack before the victims have even been buried by victim-blaming lacks class, just remember France did the same to America after September 11, right?

Nope. They showered the country with support and love.

CSR-shoestring-ERWWPR_TheFrenchWillNeverForget

Paris memorial made in honor of the victims of America’s terrorist attack. (via PR News Online)

Fox News took a different route. Emerson announced that much of Europe was being systematically taken over by Muslims, so of course they would be attacked by terrorists. To prove that point, he noted that the English city of Birmingham was “totally Muslim” and that non-Muslims did not enter.

Watch Fox host Judge Pirro’s face freeze up as she tries not to cringe while Emerson goes off the rails:

“In Britain, it’s not just no-go zones, there are actual cities like Birmingham that are totally Muslim where non-Muslims just simply don’t go in.”

In other places in England, roving bands of “Muslim religious police” wander the streets savagely beating anyone who doesn’t “dress according to religious Muslim attire.”

Rather than call Emerson on it, Pirro actually agrees with him, somberly concluding that what he described sounds like a “caliphate” within England.

But here’s the thing: Every single sentence Emerson just said is completely and utterly false. A noxious mix of xenophobic stupidity and outright dishonesty. And unlike the more vague lies that Fox typically trades in, this one can be objectively disproven easily. Is Birmingham completely Muslim?

No. According to publicly available census data that Emerson didn’t bother to look up, Birmingham is 20% Muslim, and a majority of residents are Christian – hardly a burgeoning caliphate in the heart of Great Britain. Nor so, does England allow Muslim residents to systematically assault non-Muslims in the streets.

Thankfully, the rest of the world wasn’t as kind to Emerson as Pirro, taking to twitter with the hashtag “#FoxNewsFacts” people from England and beyond mocked the sheer stupidity of his words. The hashtag quickly became one of the top trending topics on Twitter.

According to UK writer Chris Stokel-Walker, Emerson is aware that he is the laughingstock of the world and apparently feels kind of bad about going on Fox News.

It’s pretty clear that the “sources” he had relied on were bogus. That seems par for the course for Emerson, who first became known for his terrorism “expertise” after he concluded that the Oklahoma City Bombing was definitely done by a Saudi-based jihadist group– right up until the moment police caught right-wing white American, Timothy McVeigh.

This is what passes as an “expert” on Fox News.

Gun-loving Fox hosts ‘high five’ after Paris attack: ‘Best thing Americans can do is arm themselves’

Fox News host Eric Bolling (screen grab)

Fox News host Eric Bolling (screen grab)

The Raw Story

Several Fox News hosts responded to a terrorist attack in Paris on Wednesday by advising Americans to buy more guns.

After gunmen killed 12 people at a satirical French magazine that had published caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad, Fox News host Eric Bolling lamented that the New York City Police Department (NYPD) had been ordered to reform its “stop and frisk” policy over concerns about racial profiling.

“You’re taking a law enforcement tool out of their hands,” he said. “In New York, one of the first things Mayor de Blasio did here is he said we’re going to pull stop and frisk. In deference to the Fourth Amendment — unreasonable searches and seizures — they said it was unreasonable to profile African-Americans or anyone for that matter… Point is, why are we pulling law enforcement tools out of their hands?”

“There’s been a serious push from the left saying let’s not over-militarize our cops. That should put an end to that discussion right now. We should over-militarize, we should continue to do that.”

Co-host Kennedy Montgomery worried, however, that Bolling was calling for a “police state.”

“I think that cops should have all sorts of tools and technology, but they shouldn’t see us as the enemy,” she insisted. “We are not the people they’re hunting or combating. That’s the difference between the military and the police.”

“But we are being hunted,” co-host Harris Faulkner said. “These guys make it very clear when they entered that newspaper’s offices, we are being hunted. So, how would you like for us to be protected?”

“I think that the best thing Americans can do is arm themselves,” Montgomery argued.

“Me too!” Bolling exclaimed.

“Can we do a high five?” Fox News host Shannon Bream asked, prompting Montgomery to make a high five motion in the air.

“But you can’t do that in the city,” Bolling complained.

“New York cops, I don’t feel like they look at me as the enemy,” Montgomery opined.

“Kennedy, you’re not a bad guy though,” Bolling remarked. “If I’m a bad guy, I see a heavily-armed cop on the corner, I may decide not to do the bad thing I was thinking about doing.”

Bream pointed out that all of the gunmen in Paris attack were wearing masks so it was too early to make assumptions about what color they were.

“What if they didn’t look like typical bad guys?” she noted.

Watch the video below from Fox News’ Out Numbered, broadcast Jan. 7, 2015.