Cathy McMorris Rodgers

Paul Krugman: GOP’s Obamacare lies hurt American families

Paul Krugman: GOP's Obamacare lies hurt American families

(Credit: AP Photo/ Francisco Seco)

As comprehensive and satisfying a take-down of the modern GOP as you will read…(Salon)

Salon

Award-winning economist and best-selling author Paul Krugman’s latest column for the New York Times is an unapologetic attack on the Republican Party for, in Krugman’s words, “trying to deceive voters” and, in the process, “deceiving themselves.”

What’s got Krugman riled up this time is the GOP’s official response to President Obama’s 2014 State of the Union address, in which Washington congresswoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers argued Obamacare “is not working” and, as proof, cited the experience of one of her constituents, Bette Grenier, who claimed to have seen her monthly premiums increase by a whopping $700.

Before explaining the problems with Grenier’s story, Krugman makes quick work of McMorris Rodgers’ assertion that Obamacare is not working. He notes that sign-ups, while slightly behind projections due to the disastrous rollout of Healthcare.gov, are nevertheless happening at a rapid speed, and that most insurance companies are thus far not concerned that the applicant pool is too old and sick (which could lead to higher premiums for everyone else).

“[T]he law,” Krugman declares, “is doing its job.”

Moving on to Bette Grenier, Krugman, like Salon’s Brian Beutler, points out that Gernier’s story almost immediately fell apart once it was examined by members of Washington state’s media.

The biggest problem with her tale was the fact that Grenier, if she wanted to, could have found a much cheaper alternative than the $700-hike plan, but she refused, saying, “I wouldn’t go on that Obama website.”

Moreover, Krugman notes that Grenier’s prior insurance was pretty bad — it was barebones, had “a $10,000 deductible” and “[offered] very little financial protection.”

But instead of blaming Grenier, Krugman charges Republicans like McMorris Rodgers, who rely on “misleading stories at best, and often outright deceit” in order to portray Obamacare as an unmitigated disaster.

“Who pays the price for this deceit?” Krugman asks. “In many cases, American families. Although health care enrollment is actually going pretty well at this point, thousands and maybe millions of Americans have failed to sign up for coverage because they believe the false horror stories they keep hearing.”

But they’re not the only ones. Krugman also engages in a little bit of concern trolling, warning the GOP that their confidence in Obamacare’s malfunctioning is leading them to a false sense of security about their chances in November’s elections. “[C]onservative politicians aren’t just deceiving their constituents,” Krugman writes, “they’re also deceiving themselves.”

“Right now, Republican political strategy seems to be to stall on every issue, and reap the rewards from Obamacare’s inevitable collapse,” he continues. “Well, Obamacare isn’t collapsing — it’s recovering pretty well from a terrible start. And by the time that reality sinks in on the right, health reform will be irreversible.”

Congressman Calls For New Birther Investigation, Questions ‘The President’s Validity’

Even when this president has completed his second term, there will always be people who hate the concept of an African-American as president of the United States.  It’s just the nature of the enduring hatred for progress that a small group of people will never accept.

I have another website that I eventually stopped updating because after Barack Obama won his second term, my job was done on that site.

However, I’ve noticed quite a number of anonymous searches after I stopped blogging on the site.  Their search options allowed me to speculate that they were probably looking for dirt on the president or  perhaps just researching the many negative claims  about the President.

Some of you may be familiar with the site called Sinclair Watch a website dedicated to exposing a man who claimed to have had a homosexual affair with Obama back in 1999.

If you haven’t heard about this it may be because as much as the media wanted to jump on the story if it were true, their investigations showed that Larry Sinclair had a checkered past (to say the least) and there were a few other issues as well.  So his story never hit the mainstream media but he had an internet following that was pretty massive…for a while.  That is, until Orly Taitz and her birther movement came into play.

Now it seems that although the birther movement has  fizzled out, the die-hards in the GOP have decided to find something in the “birther movement” meme that may stick.

I can’t begin to discuss the insanity and the inanity of such a move.

Think Progress

Another Republican is accusing President Obama of secretly being a Kenyan man who forged his birth certificate in order to get elected President of the United States. This time the theorist is Rep. Jeff Duncan (R-SC), chairman of the House Homeland Security Oversight Subcommittee.

Duncan appeared on the radio program TruNews with Rick Wiles on Friday where the host asked the South Carolina congressman whether the House would go after Obama’s “phony identification papers.” Duncan initially demurred, but then agreed with Wiles that Obama could be lying about his birth certificate, calling for Congress to “revisit” the issue of “the president’s validity.”

WILES: While you guys are rounding up and deporting the illegal immigrants, any chance the House may actually pursue Barack Obama’s phony identification papers? That’s the original scandal, congressman.

DUNCAN: People should have voted against him in November. I’m afraid that that wouldn’t get to the Supreme Court where it ought to get.

WILES: But if we know they’re lying about all these other things, why not go back and say, “well maybe the first scandal was a lie, too?”

DUNCAN: There you go. I’m all with you. Let’s go back and revisit some of these things because Americans have questions about not only the IRS scandal but also about the president’s validity.

Watch it:

Other prominent Republican birthers include Florida Gov. Rick Scott (R), Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal (R), former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee (R), and Reps. Steve King (R-IA), Richard Hudson (R-NC), Mike Coffman (R-CO), and Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA).

At this point, the birther conspiracy is so thoroughly debunked that Republicans could accuse Obama of secretly being a Snorlax and it would be no less credible than accusing him of being a modern-day Manchurian candidate.

In his three years in Congress, Duncan has developed a reputation for controversial statements. He has invoked other conspiracy theories peddled on websites like the Drudge Report, falsely claimed that he didn’t vote to extend big oil subsidies, and warned that background checks will lead to Rwandan-like genocide in the United States.

(HT: RightWingWatch)

7 Birthers Speaking At The Republican Convention

Speechless…

Think Progress

Mitt Romney’s invocation of birtherism on Friday took his campaign to a new level of involvement with the bogus idea that President Obama is actually Kenyan-born and therefore ineligible to serve as Commander-in-Chief. But that dog-whistle theory has already been embraced by many major Republicans with whom Romney has long been happy to consort.

Indeed, as Republicans head down to Tampa for their convention next week, they are preparing to see a veritable festival of politicians who have dabbled in — or fully embraced — birtherism.

Here are the members of the birther bunch who will be speaking in Tampa next week:

1. Donald Trump. The famed billionaire/birther king Donald Trump has been the most vociferous — and most closely connected to Romney — person alleging that the President wasn’t born in the United States.

2. Actress Janine Turner. The Northern Exposure star who has her own conservative radio show wrote a long screed titled “Reasoning ‘Kenyan Born.’” In it, she complains that anyone who questions the president’s citizenship is deemed a racist: “If this were a legal case in court, [Obama’s] book bio stating that Obama was ‘born in Kenya’ would be taken into consideration.”

3. Georgia Attorney General Sam Olens. During a town hall captured on video  (at 3:5), Olens said, “You know the state of Hawaii says he’s produced a certified birth certificate… so on one hand I have to trust the state of Hawaii follows the laws. On the other hand it would be nice for the President to say, here it is, I have a copy.”

4. Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee. On one radio appearance during Huckabee’s bid for president, the former governor said, “I would love to know more [about where Obama was born]. What I know is troubling enough.” He later walked back the statement.

5. Florida Gov. Rick Scott. In 2010, the Orlando Sentinel reported than an audience member at one of Scott’s campaign events asked “what he would do about President Obama’s ‘birth certificate’ and whether he could legally appear on the 2012 ballot in Florida.” Scott responded, “I’ll have to look into it.”

6. Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA). The Vice-Chairman of the House Republican Conference once told reporters “Oh, I’d like to see the documents.”

7. Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal. Jindal was willing to sign a “birther” bill into law. It would have required all presidential candidates to release their birth certificate in order to qualify for a spot on the state’s ballot.

Top Republican Strategist Denies Women Are Paid Less Than Men

I have to wonder if this is willful ignorance or being just plain stupid!

Think Progress

This morning, during a heated discussion with Rachel Maddow on Meet The Press, GOP consultant Alex Castellanos denied that women make 77 cents for a man’s dollar in the workplace and noted, “there are lots of reasons for that.” Maddow expressed shock at the assertion, but concluded that it explained why Republicans and Mitt Romney are so hesitant to embrace the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009, a law that helps women hold accountable employers who discriminate in the pay practices based on gender.

“Now we know, at least from both of your perspectives,” Maddow said, pointing to Castellanos and Romney surrogate Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA), “women are not fairing worse than men in the economy that women aren’t getting paid less for equal work.” “It’s about policy and whether or not you want to fix some of the structural discrimination that women really do face that Republicans don’t believe is happening,” she added. Castellanos responded to Maddow’s policy argument by remarking on her passion, to which the MSNBC host took offense:

CASTELLANOS: It is about policy and I love how passionate you are. I wish you were as right about what you’re saying as you are passionate about it. I really do.

MADDOW: That’s really condescending. This is a stylistic issue. My passion on this issue is actually me making a factual argument on it.

Watch it:

In an interview with ABC News’ Diane Sawyer earlier this month, Romney refused to say whether he would sign the Lilly Ledbetter Act, but claimed that he would not change it. Romney’s women surrogates — including McMorris Rodgers — all voted against the legislation. Castellanos himself consulted Romney during the 2008 presidential election.