Tag Archives: Anthony Weiner

10 things you need to know today: September 11, 2013

Protesters gather in front of the White House before President Obama’s speech on Syria Tuesday evening.

The Week

Obama delays strikes against Syria, Colorado voters oust two Democrats over gun control, and more

1. Obama delays military action against Syria to focus on diplomacy
President Obama said Tuesday that he would hold off on military strikes against Syria and pursue a Russian plan to take over the country’s chemical weapons. Obama, facing stiff opposition to military action, said he had asked Congress to delay a vote on authorizing force, but that if the Syrian regime fails to surrender its chemical arsenal the U.S. must retaliate to protect “our ideals and principles, as well as our national security.” [New York TimesWashington Post]
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2. Colorado lawmakers lose recall votes over gun control
Colorado voters ousted two Democratic state senators on Tuesday, including state Senate President John Morse, over their support for tougher gun laws. The recall races — the first in state history — marked ashowdown in the national debate over gun control after several mass shootings, drawing big campaign contributions from the National Rifle Association and New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, founder of Mayors Against Illegal Guns. [Reuters]
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3. De Blasio tops the Democratic field in NYC’s mayoral primary
Bill de Blasio finished first in New York’s Democratic mayoral primary on Tuesday after tapping into anger at rising income inequality and aggressive policing under outgoing Mayor Michael Bloomberg. It might take days to determine whether de Blasio, the city’s public advocate, won the 40 percent of the vote needed to avoid a run-off against his nearest rival, former city comptroller Bill Thompson. As expected, Joseph Lhota won the GOP primary. [New York Times]
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4. Explosion shakes Benghazi street on anniversary of attacks
A powerful blast damaged a Libyan Foreign Ministry building and a bank branch in Benghazi early Wednesday. The explosion came on the anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks and the 2012 assault on U.S. diplomatic compounds in Benghazi that killed ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans. The U.S. recently moved 250 Marines to a base in Italy so they could reach Libya quickly in case of trouble on the anniversary. [CNN]
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5. Apple suppliers’ shares sink after unveiling of new iPhones
Shares of Apple and its suppliers slumped early Wednesday, a day after the company unveiled a faster iPhone, and a cheaper one. Apple shares fell 2.3 percent overnight. Lens maker Largan dropped by 6.4 percent, while mini-speaker supplier ACC Technologies fell 4.7 percent in Hong Kong. Analysts said the lower-cost iPhone 5C, at $549 with no contract, was still too expensive to compete in the low-end market in emerging markets like China. [CNBC]
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6. Spitzer loses his bid for political redemption
Eliot Spitzer, who resigned as New York’s governor after a 2008 prostitution scandal, came up short in his effort to return to public office, losing the Democratic primary for New York City comptroller to Scott Stringer on Tuesday. With the count nearly complete, Stringer led 52.1 percent to 47.9 percent. In another failed redemption bid, sexting-scandal-plagued Anthony Weiner finished fifth in the city’s Democratic mayoral primary. [New York TimesUSA Today]
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7. Americans mark 9/11 anniversary with tributes to victims
Sept. 11 victims’ relatives gathered at Ground Zero in New York City early Wednesday to begin a day of ceremonies to commemorate the 12th anniversary of the terrorist attacks. At the 2-year-old memorial plaza, the victims’ loved ones will participate in the now-traditional reading of the names of the nearly 3,000 people killed when hijacked jets crashed into the World Trade Center, the Pentagon, and a field near Shanksville, Pa. [Associated Press]
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8. Documents indicate the NSA tracked phone numbers not linked to terrorism
National Security Agency personnel searched call tracking data on thousands of phone numbers that had not been properly vetted, according to previously secret documents released on Tuesday. The NSA also falsely certified to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court that it was complying with a court order to only conduct searches on numbers linked to suspected terrorists. The unauthorized searches lasted three years and were halted in 2009. [Politico]
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9. U.S. men’s soccer team clinches berth in the 2014 World Cup
The U.S. men’s soccer team defeated Mexico on Tuesday night to qualify for the 2014 World Cup in Brazil. The 2-0 victory alone wasn’t enough to secure the U.S. team its seventh straight World Cup berth. The clincher came when Honduras and Panama tied, ensuring that the U.S., which still has two qualifying matches left, would be among the top three teams in its six-team qualifying group. [USA Today]
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10. Miley Cyrus’ “Wrecking Ball” video sets a record
Miley Cyrus, fresh off her controversial televised twerking display, shattered the record for most-viewed new music video on Tuesday. Her “Wrecking Ball” video, in which she swings naked on a wrecking ball, got 19 millions on Vevo in the first 24 hours after its Monday release. The previous mark, set in July by British boy band One Direction for their single “Best Song Ever,” was just 10.9 million views. [CBS News]

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Wendy Davis, Kamala Harris, Chris Taylor & More Tough Democratic Women

130806-Murphy-Democratic-Dames-tease

The Daily Beast

Kathleen Kane has fought her governor on gay marriage. Alison Lundergan Grimes is taking on Mitch McConnell. Both are part of a rising guard of Democratic women, reports Patricia Murphy.

Wendy Davis

Texas State Senator

Never have a pair of pink running shoes, a back brace, and a YouTube connection created a bigger stir than Wendy Davis’s now-famous filibuster in the Texas state Senate against abortion restrictions. Since her 10-hour marathon, the 50-year-old Davis has rocketed to national attention with appearances on Meet the Press and on Monday, at the National Press Club. Davis has said she’ll either run for reelection or launch a bid for Texas governor, where she could succeed Rick Perry, George W. Bush, and another strong-willed Texas woman, Ann Richards. It’s hard to imagine the woman who went from Tarrant County Community College to Harvard Law School backing down from the chance to take over the governor’s mansion. The prospect has Texas and national Democrats crossing their fingers Davis will use her pink shoes for a different kind of run in 2014.

Alison Lundergan Grimes

Kentucky Secretary of State; U.S. Senate Candidate

It took Grimes less than 6 minutes at this weekend’s Fancy Farm political extravaganza to transform from a relatively unknown secretary of state to the woman taking on Mitch McConnell in 2014. With a Bluegrass lilt and her grandmother by her side, Grimes lit into McConnell as the malignancy in Washington’s cancer of dysfunction and implored voters to go from “Team Mitch” to “Team Switch.” The polished, aggressive performance put the 34-year-old lawyer on national Democrats’ radar in a big way. Knocking off the Senate minority leader will be an uphill climb, but as one of five daughters of a longtime Kentucky Democrat, Grimes knows that sometimes just making your voice heard can be as important as winning the argument.

Kamala Harris

California Attorney General

She’s the first woman, first African-American, and first Indian-American to serve as California’s attorney general, but Kamala Harris may be best known, for now, as the woman President Obama called “by far the best looking attorney general in the country.” A few details Obama neglected to point out in that introduction: her 90 percent conviction rate as the district attorney of San Francisco and her opinion on jailing violent offenders (”Lock ’em up”). Inappropriate presidential remarks aside, Democratic strategists believe they have a star on their hands in the Harris, as evidenced by her prime time speaking slot at the Democratic National Conventionand the job they see her filling one day: Supreme Court justice.

Christine Quinn

New York City Council Speaker; New York City Mayoral Candidate

Serial sexter Anthony Weiner may be getting all the press, but New York City Council Speaker Christine Quinn is quietly amassing most of the support in the circus that has become the race for New York City mayor. But “quiet” is the last word anyone would use to describe the hard-charging Quinn or her aggressive leadership style, which was deemed so volatile that The New York Times devoted an entire profile to tales of her so-called bad behavior, including “threatening, repeatedly, to slice off the private parts of those who cross her.” Accusations of sexism flew at the Timesover the article, but Quinn defended herself, saying, “I don’t think being pushy or bitchy or tough, or however you want to characterize it, is a bad thing. New Yorkers want somebody who’s going to get things done.” With a Quinnipiac poll showing Quinn more than 10 points ahead of her Democratic rivals, including Weiner, she may have a chance to start getting things done as New Yorkers’ next mayor.

Heather Mizeur

Maryland House of Delegates; Maryland Gubernatorial Candidate

The former Hill staffer, aide to John Kerry, and welder’s daughter has been called “audacious,” “canny,” and “hard-charging,” and her run for Maryland governor is all of those things. If she wins, the 40-year-old Mizeur will be Maryland’s first female governor and the nation’s first openly gay governor. For the last seven years Mizeur has served in the Maryland House of Delegates, but she made national headlines when she led the fight to legalize gay marriage in the state, telling Republican delegates, “My wife is up in the gallery and she and I will be married, and we will love each other and we will live the rest of our lives together, whether or not you choose to protect us in tragedy…you can’t stop that.”

Charlotte Golar Richie

Boston Mayoral Candidate

In 2000, The Boston Globe wrote, “People who matter in politics predict that Charlotte Golar Richie will be the first black mayor of Boston.” Thirteen years later, the former adviser to Mayor Tom Menino and Gov. Deval Patrick, one-time state legislator and nonprofit executive, is finally making a run at the Globe’s prediction in a crowded Democratic field. At a recent campaign rally, she danced herself onto the stage and told the crowd, “If you really want to make change, you can’t be sitting on the sidelines, people! You’ve got to be in it to win it. And I’m in it.” As for the chance to be the first woman to run the city, Golar Richie said, “Women in politics have been dutiful followers. Now it’s my turn. It’s our turn.”

Kathleen Kane

Kane hardly had time to unpack her boxes this year as Pennsylvania’s newest attorney general before she found herself in a constitutional showdown with Republican Gov. Tom Corbett over gay marriage. Kane has argued that the state’s law defining marriage as between a man and a woman is unconstitutional, and she has left it to the governor’s legal staff to defend the statute. Corbett’s office says it’s not up to Kane to “pick and choose” the laws she wants to enforce. Democrats in Washington, watching the AG’s battle from the sidelines in recent months, have taken notice of Kane’s fight and say the episode has proved to them she “could have a national future.”

Chris Taylor

A mom and a lawyer, Taylor says she decided to run for the state Assembly as she watched Gov. Scott Walker strip collective bargaining rights for state workers. Since winning her seat in 2011, the former Planned Parenthood Wisconsin public policy director’s habit of not mincing words has “ruffled feathers” in the capitol but also won over skeptics. She has accused Republicans of “having a hostility to actual people” and of not having “the guts” to tell voters about what’s in their bills. And she once observed that “children would have done a better job on this [GOP] bill. In fact, I would like to have my son’s kindergarten class come in here and I guarantee they will do a better job.” The “fearless” Taylor has quickly made a name for herself in the state and attracted the notice of national Democrats, who point to her as a woman who makes no apologies for their party and could have major potential in the future.

 

 

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Bill Clinton Obliterates the Latest Republican Attempt to Stop Hillary

PoliticusUSA

It took Bill Clinton less than 60 seconds to destroy the latest Republican attempt to stop his wife Hillary from running for president:

 

 

Former President Clinton was asked if the Weiner scandal was difficult to watch. He used the opportunity to knock down the Republican attempts to tie his wife to Anthony Weiner.

Clinton said, “Well, not because it is a political campaign. Neither Hillary or I was ever involved in the political campaign, and they understood that from the beginning. There are too many people running for mayor who have been my supporters, who supported her for senator, her for president. One was once a campaign manager,Mr. de Blasio But there are literally five people in that race, including one of the Republican candidates Mr. (John) Catsimatidis, who are personal friends of ours, so we are a hundred miles from that race and everyone understands that we are not going to be involved, as long as our personal friends and people who we feel obligations are involved. So, the feelings I have are all personal and since they are, I shouldn’t talk about them.”

This is all started with a New York Post story that reported that the Clintons were livid with Weiner, but the story went on to baselessly speculate that the Clintons were worried that Weiner’s scandal would hurt Hillary’s potential 2016 campaign. Conservative media picked up on that point, and have been speculating that Weiner’s sexting romps will hurt Clinton if she runs for president.

Former President Clinton’s comments revealed two things. One, there is no way that the Clintons are going to let the right use former Rep. Weiner to smear Hillary, and two, on a personal level they are probably understandably personally angry about what Weiner has done.

Republican strategists are trying their best to connect Hillary Clinton to Anthony Weiner. In a memo released to reporters on Friday, they wrote, “Hillary Clinton, has stayed mum about all of it. For someone who has not-so-veiled aspirations to lead her party, she’s failed to show any leadership in publicly denouncing Weiner’s habits or his candidacy.”

Former President Clinton stopped the whole effort to Hillary Clinton to Anthony Weiner dead in its tracks. Republicans are desperate, so desperate that they are trying to stop Hillary Clinton’s candidacy before she has even had a chance to announce it. The Republican Party couldn’t stop Obama with these types of smears and attacks. It definitely isn’t going to work on Hillary Clinton. Right now, Bill and Hillary Clinton’s messaging is more powerful than the entire Republican Party.

The Clintons have been playing this game with Republicans for twenty plus years. They know what they are doing, and over these past few decades Republicans have never won. Bill and Hillary Clinton are big leaguers, and Republicans are kidding themselves if they think that their efforts to smear Hillary will even make a dent.

 

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Why digital dirty laundry keeps taking down public figures

Former Congressman Anthony Weiner (BRENDAN MCDERMID/REUTERS )

Former Congressman Anthony Weiner (BRENDAN MCDERMID/REUTERS )

Rest assured this will be the one and only article published about “Weinergate” on TFC…

The Washington Post – Wonk Blog

New York mayoral candidate and former congressman Anthony Weiner just apologized for carrying on digital relationships involving phone sex and racy online messages — yes, again.

Public figures have been having affairs since the invention of the term “public figure.” But Weiner’s behavior is a good reminder that even when someone is taking precautions — Weiner reportedly adopted the handle “Carlos Danger” to cover his tracks — it’s almost impossible to carry on an online affair without getting caught.

For example, even retired Gen. David Petraeus was unable to hide his affair with his biographer, Paula Broadwell.  And Petraeus was the director of the CIA! While they attempted to hide their tracks by leaving messages as drafts in a shared webmail account created using an alias, the IP addresses used to access the inbox were used to pinpoint Broadwell’s identity.

That elevated risk is relatively new. Sure, there was always the risk that Lucy Mercer Rutherfurd might share a handwritten note from FDR with a reporter. But she didn’t have the ability to photocopy it, or to e-mail it to friends at the click of a button. Technology has opened up many new ways for a politician’s scorned lover to capitalize on their story with a vast trove of evidence.

Mobile apps like Snapchat promise ephemeral communications, claiming to delete photos a few seconds after they’re received. But computer security professionals have discovered that there are ways to copy Snapchat photos and keep them permanently.

And even if a scorned lover has no interest in publicizing an affair, evidence may just be sitting in an e-mail account waiting to be hacked. No matter how careful you are, there’s a risk that your illicit partner will get careless and reveal information about your liaisons.

In short, once you release information on the Internet, you can never be sure it’s been completely removed.

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10 things you need to know today: May 22, 2013

“I don’t have this burning, overriding desire to go out and run for office,” said Anthony Weiner in April.

The Week

A Senate committee approves immigration reform, Anthony Weiner launches his political comeback bid, and more

1. OKLAHOMA BEGINS CLEARING TWISTER DEBRIS

Rescue teams are winding down their search for survivors of the tornado that tore through Moore, Okla., and authorities are expected to start the mammoth task of clearing away debris. The mayor of Moore, Glenn Lewis, said he expected the death toll to remain at 24 people, including nine children. Officials had originally put the number of deaths at 51, but the state medical examiner’s office said that in the chaos after the storm some victims appear to have been counted twice. [NBC NewsCNN]
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2. SENATE COMMITTEE APPROVES IMMIGRATION REFORM BILL
The Senate Judiciary Committee approved a sweeping immigration reform bill Tuesday. The legislation would provide a path to citizenship for up to 11 million people who entered the U.S. illegally. It would also include tougher border control. President Obama, who has made immigration reform a second-term priority, said the bill was “largely consistent” with his own proposals. The landmark legislation goes to the full Senate next month. [Washington Post]
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3. ANTHONY WEINER ANNOUNCES HE’S RUNNING FOR NYC MAYOR
Disgraced former Rep. Anthony Weiner on Wednesday launched a bid to become mayor of New York City. In a campaign video, he said he would fight to create jobs and reduce regulation on small businesses. He alluded to the sexting scandal that derailed his career two years ago, saying, “Look, I made some big mistakes… but I’ve also learned some tough lessons.” Polls show him ahead of all but one rival in the Democratic primaries, and he has a $5 million war chest. [New York Times]
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4. NORTH KOREA SENDS SPECIAL ENVOY TO CHINA
North Korea sent a “special envoy” of leader Kim Jong Un to China on Wednesday in an apparent bid to mend frayed relations between the communist allies. Ties between Pyongyang and Beijing were hurt by North Korea’s February nuclear test, then worsened again when China agreed to United Nations sanctions. The visit is considered important for North Korea, as the diplomatic crisis has made Pyongyang more reliant than ever on China for exports of food and fuel. [Reuters]
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5. GOVERNMENT SEIZED FOX NEWS PHONE RECORDS, TOO
Court documents indicate that the Justice Department seized records on several Fox News phone lines as part of a leak investigation, according to The New Yorker. The document was filed in the case against Stephen Jin-Woo Kim, a former State Department contractor accused of illegally leaking classified information to James Rosen, a Fox News reporter. Prosecutors obtained records on two White House phone lines and five others associated with Fox, including what appears to be Rosen’s personal cellphone. [New Yorker]
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6. TSARNAEV ACQUAINTANCE KILLED DURING QUESTIONING
An FBI agent shot and killed a man believed to have had ties to Boston Marathon bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev. Little information was available early Wednesday, but the man, Ibrahim Todashev, reportedly was being questioned in his Orlando apartment when an altercation erupted. Investigators believe Todashev had spoken to Tsarnaev, who was killed in a shoot-out three days after the deadly April bombing, and had recently visited him in Boston. [CBS]
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7. ANTI-GAY-MARRIAGE FRENCH HISTORIAN KILLS HIMSELF IN NOTRE DAME CATHEDRAL
A far-right French historian committed suicide on the altar of Paris’ Notre Dame Cathedral on Tuesday in an apparent protest of gay marriage. Shortly after writing a blog post calling for radical action to oppose same-sex marriage in France, Dominique Venner, 78, walked into the famed cathedral, placed a letter on the altar, put the barrel of a handgun into his mouth, and pulled the trigger. Hundreds of visitors were immediately evacuated. Police did not immediately disclose what was in the letter. [Guardian]
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8. JUDGES RULE ARIZONA ABORTION LAW UNCONSTITUTIONAL
A panel of Ninth Circuit appeals judges struck down Arizona’s strict abortion law on Tuesday. The law, enacted in April 2012, made abortions illegal 20 weeks after a woman’s last menstrual period, even if the fetus had no chance of surviving. The judges said the Arizona law was unconstitutional because Supreme Court rulings guarantee women the right to end pregnancies until a fetus is deemed viable outside the womb, which typically occurs around 24 weeks. [New York Times]
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9. U.S. IDENTIFIES BENGHAZI SUSPECTS
The U.S. has identified five suspects in the attack on diplomats in Benghazi, Libya, that killed Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans last year. The men remain at large, however. Investigators have enough evidence to justify seizing them as suspected terrorists, but not enough to try them in civilian courts, as the Obama administration prefers to do, so the FBI will continue gathering proof. [Associated Press]
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10. GARCETTI WINS ELECTION TO BECOME L.A. MAYOR
City Councilman Eric Garcetti has won Los Angeles’ mayoral race. Rival candidate Wendy Greuel called Garcetti early Wednesday to concede, ending a two-year, $33 million battle to determine who would succeed Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa as the massive city’s political leader. Garcetti will be L.A.’s first Jewish mayor, and, at 42, its youngest in a century. He takes office in July. [Los Angeles Times]

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Tuesday Blog Roundup – 4-23-2013

A Moment in Boston
The stories of the runners, spectators and others in an image from the first explosio..

The Wages of Bamboozlement
Background check double-talk catches up with Sen. Flake (R-AZ).

Dem: Bombings being exploited
Partisan tempers flared at a Senate immigration hearing on Monday as top Democrats ac..

Anthony Weiner Returns To Twitter
ABC News’ Michael Falcone reports: It was a sexually-explicit tweet that forced Antho..

In Memoriam: Richie Havens 1941 – 2013
Folk singer and guitarist Richie Havens passed away Monday morning from a sudden hea..

Rupert Murdoch Defends the New York Post
News Corp. chairman and CEO Rupert Murdoch has weighed in on his tabloid’s decision t..

Video: Young science minds impress at White House
Rachel Maddow shares highlights from the White House Science Fair, include a mechani..

Video: ‘Whoever came in alive, stayed alive’ after Boston bombing
Rachel Maddow salutes the thorough, professional, and remarkably successful performa..

As Bush library opening puts his presidency back in the spotlight, his..
George W. Bush will return to the spotlight this week for the dedication of his pres..

What Chris Christie’s support for gun control says about GOP
The Senate gun control compromise failed, but that hasn’t stopped individual states f..

 

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Week in one-liners: Weiner, Palin, Reid

AP Photos

Politico

The top quotes in politics …

“Unflippingbelievable.” — Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin slamming an ad from MSNBC.

“They’re starting to grow out, getting a little irritating.” — First lady Michelle Obama talkingabout her bangs.

“We’re saying that no one is above the law, even if you are the diva Beyoncé.”— Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen demanding info about the star’s Cuba trip.

“He reminds me of the clowns at the circus.” —  Connecticut Gov. Daniel Malloy describingWayne LaPierre.

“I know I didn’t do it.”— Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid on leaked tapes of conversations about Ashley Judd.

“We’re in deep doo doo.” — Former Vice President Dick Cheney speaking frankly about North Korea.

“I wasn’t really thinking.” — Former Rep. Anthony Weiner opening up about his Internet scandal.

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Democrat firebrand Alan Grayson returning to Congress

Rep. Alan Grayson, was defeated in 2010 by a Tea Party newcomer, Steve Southerland.  Alan Grayson and Rep. Anthony Weiner of NYC were the loudest voices of the Democratic left prior to the 2010 sweep by the GOP.

Grayson was defeated and Weiner resigned over a “sex” scandal on Twitter.  Some say that both were targeted by the GOP/Tea party because they were outspoken about GOP policies that would hurt the middle-class and poor.

Tampa Bay Times

Outspoken liberal Alan Grayson won a return trip to Congress on Tuesday after a defeat two years ago, while freshman GOP Rep. Steve Southerland beat back a tough challenge. Democrats eyed several competitive seats in hopes of gaining clout in Florida’s heavily Republican congressional delegation.

Grayson won by a big margin, topping  lawyer and conservative radio host Todd Long in Central Florida’s District 9. Southerland’s win was tighter, but still decisive, defeating Al Lawson, a longtime Democratic state lawmaker and former college basketball star for the Panhandle seat.

In Miami, Republican Congressman David Rivera is being sent home after one term amid accusations of ethics violations.

With 80 percent of District 26 precincts reporting, Democrat Joe Garcia led with 53.9 percent of the vote.

The embattled Miami congressman was out-fundraised more than 2 to 1, saw his district’s lines be redrawn in a way seen more favorable to Garcia and, more than anything else, was seeking re-election under a cloud of ethical lapses.

Incumbents were leading in most of the state’s 27 seats as early returns drifted in, but a handful of races remained tight, including the most high-profile of them all: Rep. Allen West’s battle against 29-year-old political neophyte Patrick Murphy.

Republicans outnumber Democrats in the state’s current House delegation 19 to 6, with the state adding two seats this election because of its population growth. The GOP will maintain a strong majority, but Democrats aimed at several seats that switched into GOP hands two years ago and are seen as vulnerable.

In Central Florida, freshman Rep. Daniel Webster edged Democrat Val Demings, a retired Orlando police chief. And in South Florida, former West Palm Beach Mayor Lois Frankel, a Democrat, appeared to defeat Adam Hasner.

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Romney’s 47% Fiasco Fuels MSNBC Ratings Rout For Rachel Maddow

Rachel Maddow

I watch Rachel Maddow every day.  In fact I wouldn’t miss her show for all the tea in China!  So this is great news.  Rachel is not a gossip mongerer nor does she embellish the news to fit her or her company’s agenda.   She’s a natural born teacher of sorts and explains the news that she reports clearly and concisely.

This is no surprise when we all know if the news about Romney doesn’t fit their agenda, Fox News will embellish it or not report it at all.  People want facts, not propaganda.

The Daily Kos

Just like when the party conventions concluded and the DNC’s superior production boosted the audience for MSNBC’s primetime programming, the release of the crippling video of Mitt Romney dismissing half the nation as moochers  is having a positive effect on MSNBC as well.

On Monday, Rachel Maddow crushed Sean Hannity scoring 32% more viewers in the key advertiser demo of adults 25-54. Also, Chris Matthews’ Hardball beat Shepard Smith and Lawrence O’Donnell topped Greta Van Susteren.

Last night (Tuesday), Rachel again rolled over Hannity by an even larger margin (37%).  And O’Donnell continued his dominance of Van Susteren.  On both nights MSNBC took the total primetime time period from Fox News. These wins are significant in that they don’t occur very often.  What’s more, they are routing Fox’s perennial winners without any special programming along the lines of a convention or debate.  This is strictly news driven.

However, even more noteworthy is that Maddow’s demo numbers on Tuesday were the highest in all of the cable news primetime schedule.  She even bested Bill O’Reilly by 3% despite the fact that O’Reilly’s guest was Jon Stewart who ought to have drawn in the younger viewers that ordinarily shun O’Reilly. With his devoted older-skewing viewers, plus the kids from Stewart’s heavily promoted guest appearance, O’Reilly should have run away with the night.

Maddow’s decisive victory suggests that there is something brewing in the cable news game. Viewers are responding to the editorial content of MSNBC and its most dynamic presenters. It’s still way too soon to make definitive statements or projections, but the gathering trends are promising.

Now all MSNBC has to do is capitalize on the new attention they are receiving and bring in new talent. Ed Schultz, who has not been contributing to this upswing, may be due for a makeover or a co-host. And there’s no need to repeat Hardball in the early evening when a new show could could broaden the audience. My long-shot pick: I’d give former Rep. Anthony Weiner a shot. If Eliot Spitzer can get a show on Current, Weiner should have a second chance too. He’s smart, experienced, and entertaining. And the publicity would help bring in a curious audience.

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Politico’s: The week in one-liners: Rush, Bush, Weiner

AP Photo

The top quotes in politics …

“I give him his own advice.  ‘Stop whining.’”  — Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel on what Mitt Romney needs to do.

“He and his campaign team leadership need to put their big boy and big girl pants on and defend his record.” — Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz  giving Romney more advice.

“Do you think that it is accidental that the name of the really vicious fire-breathing, four-eyed whatever-it-is villain in this movie is named Bane?” — Rush Limbaugh linking a Batman villain to Romney.

“If you goad me into it, I’ll show you my tats.” — Former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty  insisting that he’s not boring.

“Eight years was awesome and I was famous and I was powerful.” — Former President George W. Bush reflecting on his time in the White House.

“That’s a stupid question.” — Sen. John McCain getting annoyed when asked why he didn’t pick Romney as his ’08 running mate.

“It’s a clown story, bro.” — Former Rep. Anthony Weiner knocking down reports that he’s planning a political comeback.

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