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General Colin Powell Was Taking “Selfies” 60 years ago…

How cool is this? The man was 60 years ahead of his time…

Colin Powell’s FaceBook Page

On Throwback Thursday, Colin Powell posted a photo he took of himself before selfies became popular. He was doing selfies before any of you, and by the way, I’m ripping all of mine to shreds because this is the selfie that trumps all others.

He writes:

“Throwback Thursday – I was doing selfies 60 years before you Facebook folks. Eat your heart out Ellen! The Ellen DeGeneres Show.”

Why Facebook lost 6 million U.S. users: 4 theories

This Week

The social networking giant reportedly lost quite a few friends in May. Market saturation, or the beginning of the end?

Facebook may be nearing 700 million users with a $100-billion IPO on the horizon, but all may not be well in Zuckerberg land. According to Inside Facebook, the social networking giant lost nearly 6 million users in the United States in May, along with 1.52 million in Canada and hundreds of thousands in the United Kingdom, Norway, and Russia. The company still managed to add 11.8 million new users worldwide last month, but its growth has been slowing significantly. What’s happening? Here, four theories:

1. Facebook has made as many friends as it can
Mark Zuckerberg and Co. may be “hitting a saturation point in key markets,” especially in the U.S., where roughly 50 percent of the population is already on Facebook, says Kent Bernhard Jr. at Portfolio. If that’s the case, the social network might not be able to reach Zuckerberg’s goal of 1 billion users without conquering China (and its strict online censorship).

2. People are sick of Facebook
“I think users are deleting their accounts because they… are burnt out,” says Lindsay Mannering at The Stir. Even Bill Gates, a Zuckerberg friend and Facebook investor, recently quit the social networking site, saying his friend requests had gotten “out of hand.” I don’t blame him. “Between the feeds and the friends, it’s too much… more of an obligation than a fun way to pass a few minutes.” No wonder people are logging off for good.

3. This is just a temporary dip
“Seasonal changes like college graduations, and other short-term factors, can influence numbers month to month and obscure what’s really happening,” says Eric Eldon at Inside Facebook. These May figures are certainly intriguing, but let’s not overreact. The long-term trends are the ones that really matter.

4. Other social networks are on the rise
It’s “worth noting” that Twitter and LinkedIn are gaining in many of the areas that Facebook saw big losses — namely the U.S. Canada, and the United Kingdom, says Robin Wauters at TechCrunch. But let’s not forget that “on a global level… Facebook is drawing more visitors than ever.”

 

Did You Know…?

All topics come from The Huffington Post:

Facebook Credits Program Pays You To Watch Video Ads

Facebook introduced a new program on Thursday that attempts to incentivize users to watch ads… by paying them in Facebook Credits, the company’s virtual currency. Just last month, Facebook finally announced Credits could be cashed in on its Groupon competitor, Facebook Deals.     More…

 

Facebook Deals Tips: 11 Things You Need To Know

The daily and social deals space is getting hotter everyday — Google launched Offers just last week — and Facebook showed up early this morning with a serious offering that could shift the tech world’s intense focus away from industry darling Groupon.

Facebook Deals is noticeably different from competitors like Gilt, Groupon and LivingSocial, so click on to see what sets it apart, how to find deals, adjust your notifications, and why the News Feed is so important.   See slide show of FaceBook Deals here…

 

Google Business Photos Brings Street View Inside

TechCrunch reports that Marissa Mayer, Google VP of Location and Local Services, told a crowd at the Social Loco social networking conference that Google Business Photos will soon be bringing Street View indoors. With the new service, users will be able to explore restaurants, stores and other businesses in a panorama interface that’s very similar to Google’s Street View. While sites like Yelp let businesses and users upload photos, Google Business Photos is relying on its own photographers to populate the pages, and Google requires businesses to opt in before letting photographers visit businesses. Think of the photographers like flesh and blood Googlemobiles.     More here…

 

Marijuana Crop Found Near Osama Bin Laden’s Pakistan Compound

Details are continuing to emerge regarding Osama bin Laden’s top-secret Abbottabad compound, but the discovery of some high-strength marijuana plants just yards from the home has set the blogosphere aflame with speculation.

Said to be worth $1 million (though that estimate is now hotly debated), the home of the world’s most feared terrorist has attracted crowds of Pakistanis and media to its now sealed-off gates. But a stroll around the 20-foot-tall, barbed wire-ringed walls led CNN’s Nic Robertson to the cannibis crop, barely hidden alongside a garden of cabbages and potatoes.   More here…

 

Oil Prices Plunge In Record Sell-Off

Oil prices took a nosedive Thursday in a historic selloff, erasing weeks of gains and indicating that the months-long climb in energy prices may have hit a ceiling.

Crude oil plunged 10 percent as startled investors unloaded their positions and a weeklong decline accelerated into an outright freefall. The price of U.S. crude went from triple digits to double digits, falling below $100 after opening at close to $110. Brent crude, a European benchmark, lost $12 at one point in a sell-off that exceeded the one following Lehman Brothers’ collapse, Reuters reported.        More…

Facebook Woos Washington

The Daily Beast

Obama hosts a town-hall at Facebook headquarters today, a sign of the social media giant’s growing political power and its oddly symbiotic relationship with the president—he needs Facebook for reelection, it needs him to stay in Congress’ good books.

When President Obama visited with some Silicon Valley big shots in February, the tech blog Business Insider ran a photo of the president chatting with Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg.

Below the photo, a commenter called “pauldeba” posted: “I gotta say,

it must feel impressive meeting the most powerful man in the world. I wonder how Obama feels about it.”

Think about it. Zuckerberg’s company has 600 million members, making it about twice as big as the United States.

So the true significance of Obama’s visit Wednesday to Facebook headquarters in Palo Alto, California, won’t involve anything the president says. Simply by doing this event, a town-hall meeting that will be broadcast on the Internet, the White House is recognizing Facebook’s growing power and influence in politics and the culture at large.

What TV was to John Kennedy, Facebook is to Obama. Social media in general, and Facebook in particular, have become so important to politics that you almost can’t run for president without mastering the new medium.

The event also reflects the way that Facebook, from the very beginning, has learned how to curry favor in Washington. Unlike tech giants Microsoft and Google, which shunned Washington and refused to play the game, and as a result ended up in hot water with regulators, Facebook recognized the need to build bridges with lawmakers early on.

One of the smartest things Zuckerberg ever did was to bring aboard Sheryl Sandberg, the company’s chief operating officer, who will play co-host during the Obama town-hall meeting. Sandberg came to Facebook from Google, but before that she was a power player in D.C., serving as chief of staff under Larry Summers during his tenure as secretary of the Treasury. She’s now a member of the recently formed President’s Council for Jobs and Competitiveness.

Continue here…

Time Person Of The Year 2010: Mark Zuckerberg

Huffington Post

Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg has been named Time magazine’s “Person of the Year” for 2010.

At 26, Zuckerberg has put himself on the map not only as one of the world’s youngest billionaires, but also as a prominent newcomer to the world of philanthropy.

Earlier this year, he pledged $100 million over five years to the Newark, N.J. school system. Now, he’s in the company of media titans Carl Icahn, 74, Barry Diller, 68, and others who have joined Giving Pledge, an effort led by Microsoft founder Bill Gates and investor Warren Buffett to commit the country’s wealthiest people to step up their charitable donations.

Zuckerberg owns about a quarter of Facebook’s shares.

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke received the honor last year. The 2008 winner was then-President-elect Barack Obama. The 2007 winner was Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin.

Other previous winners have included Bono, President George W. Bush, and Amazon.com CEO and founder Jeff Bezos.

Time’s “Person of the Year” is the person or thing that has most influenced the culture and the news during the past year for good or for ill.

Bill Collectors Turn Up on Facebook

One thing is certain for Facebook users…listing too much information about yourself on Facebook is never a good idea.  See my post on 13 things NOT to post of Facebook.

AOL News

The relentless phone calls were one thing, the Facebook messages were another.

Melanie Beacham, of St. Petersburg, Fla., said she fell behind in her car payments after falling ill, and she contacted MarkOne Financial to say she would make a payment when she could.

Still, she kept getting up to 20 phone calls a day from the lender and said it contacted her sister in Georgia and other relatives via Facebook.

Beacham contacted a lawyer, Billy Howard, who filed a lawsuit against MarkOne, asking a judge to ban the company from using social networking sites like Facebook to contact Beacham’s friends about her debt, according to WTSP.com.

“Now Facebook does a debt collector’s work for them,” Howard said. “Now it’s not only family members, it’s all of your associates. It’s a very powerful tool for debt collectors to use.”

Beacham said the incident was embarrassing.

“Nobody should have to go through what I went through,” she said. “I was hurt because I just felt I didn’t need my family going through that. Even though that’s my family, I don’t need them to know my personal business.”

MarkOne Financial was unavailable for comment to the station.

Friended for $100 Million

Wall Street Journal - Facebook Founder Zuckerberg to Establish Foundation to Help Newark Schools

Mark Zuckerberg, the 26-year-old founder and chief executive of Facebook Inc., plans to announce a donation of up to $100 million to the Newark schools this week, in a bold bid to improve one of the country’s worst performing public school systems.

Newark spends about $22,000 a year on each of its 40,000 pupils, but only about half of its students graduate. Of those who do, only one-fifth go on to four-year colleges. More than 85% of the Newark students at community colleges need remedial help in math and English.

The state took control of the troubled Newark system in the 1990s, and this month Gov. Chris Christie informed the city’s superintendent that his contract wouldn’t be renewed after June 2011. Mr. Christie has vowed to implement forceful changes, portending an agenda that includes stronger teacher evaluations and merit pay.

Mr. Zuckerberg is setting up a foundation with $100 million of Facebook’s closely held stock to be used to improve education in America, with the primary goal of helping Newark.

Mr. Zuckerberg has had a long-standing interest in education, particularly teachers’ low salaries, according to a person familiar with the discussions. Over the last year, he had a series of meetings with people involved in education and developed a relationship with Newark Mayor Cory Booker.        Continue reading…