Tucker Carlson attacks Obama over ‘phony’ black vernacular

Daily Caller’s Tucker Carlson speaks to Fox News

The Raw Story

Tucker Carlson, founder of The Daily Caller, on Tuesday night slammed President Barack Obama for using black vernacular in a “racially divisive” speech that occurred five years ago.

“Let me just be totally clear, anyone who just watched it and has seen Obama speak in public over the last ten years will note this accent is absurd,” he told Fox News host Sean Hannity. “This is not the way Obama talks. At least it is not the way he talked in the scores of speeches I’ve watched him give, the public appearances I’ve seen him make. This is a put on. This is phony.”

The Daily Caller on Tuesday published a “never-before-seen” video of Obama delivering a speech at Hampton University Annual Ministers’ Conference in 2007 in which he spoke about poverty among African-Americans.

Tucker said the speech was meant to tell the mostly African-American audience that the federal government was racist. He accused Obama of making “appeals to racial solidarity.”

“The falseness here is overwhelming,” Tucker said, after Hannity played two clips where Obama spoke in different tones.

“And I would say whether he was putting on a southern accent or Asian accent, it doesn’t matter. He is playing a role in one of these cases. It is not clear in which one. I assume in the Hampton’s speech he is putting on a persona he doesn’t usually occupy to pander to the crowd, but who knows?”

Watch video, uploaded to YouTube, below:

 

5 comments

  1. I can’t be quiet about Carlson’s criticism. I was ‘born and bred in the briarpatch’ on the edge of the Everglades, and grew up in a small Florida ‘hick town.’ I am a college educated person who has held mid-level management positions during my career, and have a fairly good command of the English language. Like many other Americans, however, I have lived in various areas and learned a good bit of the colloquialisms and expressions used in various locations in this great and expansive country of ours.

    On the rare occasions that I get back to visit people where I grew up, I use many of the mannerisms, speak with a natural ‘Southern drawl,’ and find that much of my formerly well-learned local dialect naturally — and instinctively — becomes part of my conversation. I also lived in Hawaii for seven years and, consequently, when I am talking with native Hawaiians — or with persons who have spend a considerable amount of time there — we naturally, without even thinking about it, use many Hawaiian words and phrases that our association naturally brings to mind.

    Do I find it unusual, or stepping out of character, for Obama to speak in a ‘homeboy’ manner when being with other persons who have much the same background as his? You can be sure that If I was talking casually with the President we would both likely use some of our well remembered Hawaiian words and expressons.

    For Tucker Carlson’s information, as well as information for others, that is what Americans do. It isn’t demeaning, or unnatural. If I spoke like a Harvard graduate when talking to peple in my home-town, they would rightfully feel that I was “putting on airs.” (That’s what folks in south-central Florida would call it.)

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    1. Spot on post, Ted.

      Years ago the T.V. networks realized Tucker Carlson was/is an over rated pretty face and relegated him to the third or fourth tier of TV journalists. I can’t stand to watch him.

      BTW, my Father was from North Carolina and he would routinely caution me against “putting on airs” (or giving others the opportunity to accuse me of same.)

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      1. Thanks for the back-up, LTL. It really helps when a person sticks their neck out to have someone cover their back!
        ‘Preciate it.

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    2. Really good points Ted. I managed an office (small business) for a guy who was from Jamaica, WI. If you heard him speak you’d imagine he was just an everyday American…no accent at all. Yet, when he was around relatives or on the phone with them, he’d talk in a very thick regional Jamaican accent.

      So I understand and appreciate your point very well. Now when Hillary wooed a crowd of southern Blacks in a Baptist Church in 2008, that was pandering.

      Thanks for your insight, Ted.

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